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dayeh33
03-20-2012, 01:27 AM
@AdamSchefter: Jacksonville reached agreement with former Giants CB Aaron Ross on a three-year deal worth up to $15.3 million.

Diamondring
03-20-2012, 01:37 AM
They shouldn't have done that. We have a great D-line and that halped him in his success with the Giants. Now I predict he will do nothing special for them and soon will be cut loose.

NWKEffectElement
03-20-2012, 01:44 AM
Thank you Ross!! You deserve to feed your family. Good Luck!!

GMan883
03-20-2012, 01:44 AM
They shouldn't have done that. We have a great D-line and that halped him in his success with the Giants. Now I predict he will do nothing special for them and soon will be cut loose.

that was the first thing i thought of when i heard the news

TheBookOfEli
03-20-2012, 01:53 AM
Eh not my favorite Giant but once a Giant, always a GIANT.

Good luck in Jacksonville, Ross! Thank you for you help in our 2 Superbowl victories.

Diamondring
03-20-2012, 01:56 AM
Eh not my favorite Giant but once a Giant, always a GIANT.

Good luck in Jacksonville, Ross! Thank you for you help in our 2 Superbowl victories.Yeah he and others before him are like body transsplants for the the teams they signed with.

KillaRich
03-20-2012, 03:02 AM
damn.....i like ross.....but holy **** they paid alot for him

Martyr
03-20-2012, 03:12 AM
Good luck I hope he does well for Jacksonville god knows they need help. I take back all the times I called you mr glass

Flip Empty
03-20-2012, 04:24 AM
Oh damn, he's gone and messed up his career like Manningham. He's getting paid but his new team isn't very good so that's definitely a bad move.
He must be "dumb".

miked1958
03-20-2012, 05:05 AM
Thank you Ross!! You deserve to feed your family. Good Luck!!this is in no way directed to NWKelement, its just in general. Now I know that is a figure of speech but please. And I know the terminology is used all the time across the nfl when referring to a guy leaving his old team and signing a huge contract elsewhere. However, deserving to be able to feed his family and a player signing for millions and millions over 3-4 yrs should not be used synonymously together. EVER

miked1958
03-20-2012, 05:07 AM
These guys don't know the meaning of struggling to feed your family working three jobs. At least not anymore. These guys could all resign for the Vet Min and NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their family.

miked1958
03-20-2012, 05:11 AM
By the way fully agree with diamond ring and flip empty on this subject

miked1958
03-20-2012, 05:19 AM
@AdamSchefter: Jacksonville reached agreement with former Giants CB Aaron Ross on a three-year deal worth up to $15.3 million.He for sure is not worth almost 4m per season

GMENAGAIN
03-20-2012, 06:34 AM
damn.....i like ross.....but holy **** they paid alot for him</P>


Eh . . . a max of $15M for 3 years is not a lot for a CB . . .. </P>

GMENAGAIN
03-20-2012, 06:35 AM
These guys don't know the meaning of struggling to feed your family working three jobs. At least not anymore. These guys could all resign for the Vet Min and NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their family.</P>


5-7 years (average length of NFL career) at the vet minimum will enable you to take care of your family for the rest of your life???</P>

giantyankee1976
03-20-2012, 06:52 AM
I had great hopes from him before his injury.

Never forgot that tackle he made against the Boys in which he separated his shoulder.

Felt like he stepped up this past year when TT went down.

Thank you AR31 for your commitment to do your best for Big Blue !!!

Good Luck in FL !

ebick
03-20-2012, 07:11 AM
These guys don't know the meaning of struggling to feed your family working three jobs. At least not anymore. These guys could all resign for the Vet Min and NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their family.</P>


5-7 years (average length of NFL career) at the vet minimum will enable you to take care of your family for the rest of your life???</P>


</P>


Well, let's do the math. Let's say 6 years @ $350K. That comes to $2,100,000. According to this:</P>


http://www.mybudget360.com/how-much-does-the-average-american-make-breaking-down-the-us-household-income-numbers/</P>


The average income in the US is 46K. So, 2.1 /46 = 45 years.</P>


Discuss.</P>

Flip Empty
03-20-2012, 07:44 AM
These guys don't know the meaning of struggling to feed your family working three jobs. At least not anymore. These guys could all resign for the Vet Min and NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their family.</P>


5-7 years (average length of NFL career) at the vet minimum will enable you to take care of your family for the rest of your life???</P>


</P>


Well, let's do the math. Let's say 6 years @ $350K. That comes to $2,100,000. According to this:</P>


http://www.mybudget360.com/how-much-does-the-average-american-make-breaking-down-the-us-household-income-numbers/</P>


The average income in the US is 46K. So, 2.1 /46 = 45 years.</P>


Discuss.</P>
Yeah, unless they're careless with their money (which unfortunately, many are), any NFL player should be able to live a comfortable life.
Hell, even the practice squadders earn at least 5k per week.

JimC
03-20-2012, 08:00 AM
Oh damn, he's gone and messed up his career like Manningham. He's getting paid but his new team isn't very good so that's definitely a bad move.
He must be "dumb".

Silly premise.

BigBlue1971
03-20-2012, 08:34 AM
good luck Arron. you helped us a great deal while a NY Giant!</P>


you will always be remembered foryhe good job you done while filling in for an injured T2.</P>


</P>


<FONT color=#0000ff size=4>Go Giants!</FONT></P>


</P>

Morehead State
03-20-2012, 08:39 AM
These guys don't know the meaning of struggling to feed your family working three jobs. At least not anymore. These guys could all resign for the Vet Min and NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their family.</P>


5-7 years (average length of NFL career) at the vet minimum will enable you to take care of your family for the rest of your life???</P>


</P>


Current NFL minimum salaries</P>


1st year: $375,000</P>


2nd year: $450.00</P>


3rd year: $525.000</P>


4th year: $600,000</P>


5th and 6th: $685,000</P>


So if a player played 6 years (splitting your 5-7 years) and only made the vet minimum, he would earn $3,320,000</P>


Anyone who makes that much money in their lives can definately "feed their family". And if you make it in the first 6 years of your adulthood, you can actually continue to work and not retire at age 28.</P>


So yes, they can feed their family for life.</P>


</P>

MattMeyerBud
03-20-2012, 08:42 AM
These guys don't know the meaning of struggling to feed your family working three jobs. At least not anymore. These guys could all resign for the Vet Min and NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their family.</p>


5-7 years (average length of NFL career) at the vet minimum will enable you to take care of your family for the rest of your life???</p>


</p>


Current NFL minimum salaries</p>


1st year: $375,000</p>


2nd year: $450.00</p>


3rd year: $525.000</p>


4th year: $600,000</p>


5th and 6th: $685,000</p>


So if a player played 6 years (splitting your 5-7 years) and only made the vet minimum, he would earn $3,320,000</p>


Anyone who makes that much money in their lives can definately "feed their family". And if you make it in the first 6 years of your adulthood, you can actually continue to work and not retire at age 28.</p>


So yes, they can feed their family for life.</p>


</p>

plus most got a free edumacation from the college schoool

Bing Crosby
03-20-2012, 08:51 AM
Good luck in the future Mr. Ross. Thank you for the memories.

hungrrrry
03-20-2012, 08:55 AM
last year was a bod year for defensive football...I wouldn't feel bad about the loss of Ross...we were one of the worst defenses in a bad year for defense...he had some good plays, yes but he had a lot of missed tackles and poor effort plays. I think Amukamara will be fine...TT should be fine and Webster has been very good! Coe and Johnson were both better than Ross...Tryon is also a good fill in. We aren't losing a lot with Ross.

Jags need depth and that is what they got...Ross got a nice payday in my opinion and that would have been a terrible signing for us

TuckYou
03-20-2012, 09:07 AM
Alot of you are saying the 4yr 28M contract T2 got was ok, but the 3yr 15.5M deal for Ross isnt? </P>


I know, the T2 contract can be torn up after 1yr and like 2M, but if he plays ok this season, he will get an 11M guarantee or something like that. </P>


Who knows how the Ross contract is set up. It does say UP TO 15.5M. Im assuming there are incentives and injury security in it as well. Besides, the Jags are well under the cap so it isnt a huge deal for them. And Ross, as much as he gets burnt like toast, is an upgrade to them and has 2 SB rings to show their young guys. </P>


I don't think it is a bad signing for the Jags at all even though Ross would of been the #4 CB here if T2 and Prince were not injuried. He is easly their #2, maybe even #1 CB. </P>


Jags should of went hard after Manningham though instead of Ross. </P>

slipknottin
03-20-2012, 09:10 AM
he really only plays well during SB runs, which wont be any time soon for the Jags

MattMeyerBud
03-20-2012, 09:12 AM
he really only plays well during SB runs, which wont be any time soon for the Jags

ehh...

i'd say he plays well when hes healthy and has a chance to get inthe flow of the game.

Hes missed alot of time up to this point.

slipknottin
03-20-2012, 09:19 AM
he really only plays well during SB runs, which wont be any time soon for the Jags

ehh...

i'd say he plays well when hes healthy and has a chance to get inthe flow of the game.

Hes missed alot of time up to this point.


"in the flow of the game" meaning it takes him roughly 15 games before he starts playing at a good level. So im sure it will do the jags well those 2 games a season.

GMENAGAIN
03-20-2012, 09:20 AM
These guys don't know the meaning of struggling to feed your family working three jobs. At least not anymore. These guys could all resign for the Vet Min and NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their family.</P>


5-7 years (average length of NFL career) at the vet minimum will enable you to take care of your family for the rest of your life???</P>


</P>


Current NFL minimum salaries</P>


1st year: $375,000</P>


2nd year: $450.00</P>


3rd year: $525.000</P>


4th year: $600,000</P>


5th and 6th: $685,000</P>


So if a player played 6 years (splitting your 5-7 years) and only made the vet minimum, he would earn $3,320,000</P>


Anyone who makes that much money in their lives can definately "feed their family". And if you make it in the first 6 years of your adulthood, you can actually continue to work and not retire at age 28.</P>


So yes, they can feed their family for life.</P>


</P>


</P>


Guess that they don't pay taxes, huh? Or agents?</P>

Bluetooss
03-20-2012, 09:25 AM
For a guy that started on two Super Bowl winning teams, he sure gets very little respect around here...

slipknottin
03-20-2012, 09:26 AM
For a guy that started on two Super Bowl winning teams, he sure gets very little respect around here...


probably because he was horrible for everything in between.

Captain Chaos
03-20-2012, 09:32 AM
Thank you Ross!! You deserve to feed your family. Good Luck!!

Thanks for the memories Ross! Good luck!

MattMeyerBud
03-20-2012, 09:36 AM
he really only plays well during SB runs, which wont be any time soon for the Jags

ehh...

i'd say he plays well when hes healthy and has a chance to get inthe flow of the game.

Hes missed alot of time up to this point.


"in the flow of the game" meaning it takes him roughly 15 games before he starts playing at a good level. So im sure it will do the jags well those 2 games a season.

na he was fine by midseason and stepped up when it mattered...

greenca190
03-20-2012, 09:44 AM
These guys don't know the meaning of struggling to feed your family working three jobs. At least not anymore. These guys could all resign for the Vet Min and NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their family.</P>


5-7 years (average length of NFL career) at the vet minimum will enable you to take care of your family for the rest of your life???</P>


</P>


Current NFL minimum salaries</P>


1st year:* $375,000</P>


2nd year: $450.00</P>


3rd year: $525.000</P>


4th year: $600,000</P>


5th and 6th: $685,000</P>


So if a player played 6 years (splitting your 5-7 years) and only made the vet minimum, he would earn $3,320,000</P>


Anyone who makes that much money in their lives can definately "feed their family".* And if you make it in the first 6 years of your adulthood, you can actually continue to work and not retire at age 28.</P>


So yes, they can feed their family for life.</P>


*</P>


</P>


Guess that they don't pay taxes, huh?* Or agents?</P>

Ding ding ding ding.

Upwards to fifty percent. And those homes you bought your family members in various states? They're paying for those as well.

RagTime Blue
03-20-2012, 10:09 AM
And they can sell those homes if they need to.

swimeasy
03-20-2012, 10:10 AM
These guys don't know the meaning of struggling to feed your family working three jobs. At least not anymore. These guys could all resign for the Vet Min and NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their family.</p>


5-7 years (average length of NFL career) at the vet minimum will enable you to take care of your family for the rest of your life???</p>


</p>


Current NFL minimum salaries</p>


1st year: $375,000</p>


2nd year: $450.00</p>


3rd year: $525.000</p>


4th year: $600,000</p>


5th and 6th: $685,000</p>


So if a player played 6 years (splitting your 5-7 years) and only made the vet minimum, he would earn $3,320,000</p>


Anyone who makes that much money in their lives can definately "feed their family". And if you make it in the first 6 years of your adulthood, you can actually continue to work and not retire at age 28.</p>


So yes, they can feed their family for life.</p>


</p>

plus most got a free edumacation from the college schoool


First and foremost, congrats to Ross. I wish him well. He arguably succeeded at leveraging the football free market (caps permitting) and got a big payday.

Had no idea that "feed your family" was a common expression. Just thought it was an attempt at cryptic humor. Now it sounds more like a canned comeback to take the bite out of all those zeros. And IA with Mike, it is insensitive to use, especially during such economic times.

gumby742
03-20-2012, 10:31 AM
These guys don't know the meaning of struggling to feed your family working three jobs. At least not anymore. These guys could all resign for the Vet Min and NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their family.</P>


5-7 years (average length of NFL career) at the vet minimum will enable you to take care of your family for the rest of your life???</P>


</P>


Current NFL minimum salaries</P>


1st year: $375,000</P>


2nd year: $450.00</P>


3rd year: $525.000</P>


4th year: $600,000</P>


5th and 6th: $685,000</P>


So if a player played 6 years (splitting your 5-7 years) and only made the vet minimum, he would earn $3,320,000</P>


Anyone who makes that much money in their lives can definately "feed their family". And if you make it in the first 6 years of your adulthood, you can actually continue to work and not retire at age 28.</P>


So yes, they can feed their family for life.</P>


</P>


</P>


you forgot uncle sam. Bonuses are taxed at around 40%. For roughly 2 million, you can keep your family alive. But let's not make it seem like they can live a "modest" life.all subjective of course. But i'd imagine they'd want to send their kids off to college. Even if you send them to a state school at 20k a year, if you have 2 kids, that's 200k right there. You can move to nowhere land Kentucky and buy a house for 100k. 10k a year on groceries times 50 is around 500k. If you buy a car every 10 years ..that's around 100k. Home repair is a ton. If i remember right, a roof is 20k. etc etc etc. Sports camps are crazy expensive. Playing an instrument can run you 10k a year easy. etc etc. the list goes on. Haha. Heck, even an iphone is 10k a year.</P>


So when the kid's are out of the nest, they won't have much left if anything at all.</P>

VelocityVirus
03-20-2012, 10:40 AM
These guys don't know the meaning of struggling to feed your family working three jobs. At least not anymore. These guys could all resign for the Vet Min and NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their family.</p>


5-7 years (average length of NFL career) at the vet minimum will enable you to take care of your family for the rest of your life???</p>


</p>


Current NFL minimum salaries</p>


1st year: $375,000</p>


2nd year: $450.00</p>


3rd year: $525.000</p>


4th year: $600,000</p>


5th and 6th: $685,000</p>


So if a player played 6 years (splitting your 5-7 years) and only made the vet minimum, he would earn $3,320,000</p>


Anyone who makes that much money in their lives can definately "feed their family". And if you make it in the first 6 years of your adulthood, you can actually continue to work and not retire at age 28.</p>


So yes, they can feed their family for life.</p>


</p>


</p>


you forgot uncle sam. Bonuses are taxed at around 40%. For roughly 2 million, you can keep your family alive. But let's not make it seem like they can live a "modest" life.all subjective of course. But i'd imagine they'd want to send their kids off to college. Even if you send them to a state school at 20k a year, if you have 2 kids, that's 200k right there. You can move to nowhere land Kentucky and buy a house for 100k. 10k a year on groceries times 50 is around 500k. If you buy a car every 10 years ..that's around 100k. Home repair is a ton. If i remember right, a roof is 20k. etc etc etc. Sports camps are crazy expensive. Playing an instrument can run you 10k a year easy. etc etc. the list goes on. Haha. Heck, even an iphone is 10k a year.</p>


So when the kid's are out of the nest, they won't have much left if anything at all.</p>

You're implying that after their NFL career they have to stop working?

Morehead State
03-20-2012, 11:01 AM
These guys don't know the meaning of struggling to feed your family working three jobs. At least not anymore. These guys could all resign for the Vet Min and NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their family.</P>


5-7 years (average length of NFL career) at the vet minimum will enable you to take care of your family for the rest of your life???</P>


</P>


Current NFL minimum salaries</P>


1st year: $375,000</P>


2nd year: $450.00</P>


3rd year: $525.000</P>


4th year: $600,000</P>


5th and 6th: $685,000</P>


So if a player played 6 years (splitting your 5-7 years) and only made the vet minimum, he would earn $3,320,000</P>


Anyone who makes that much money in their lives can definately "feed their family". And if you make it in the first 6 years of your adulthood, you can actually continue to work and not retire at age 28.</P>


So yes, they can feed their family for life.</P>


</P>


</P>


Guess that they don't pay taxes, huh? Or agents?</P>


</P>


OK, take of $300,000 for agents. And we all pay takes.</P>


But the basic notion that the NFL minimum won't "feed your family" is pure nonsense.</P>


Most of us would love to make $600,000 at age 26.</P>

jhamburg
03-20-2012, 11:09 AM
These guys don't know the meaning of struggling to feed your family working three jobs. At least not anymore. These guys could all resign for the Vet Min and NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their family.</P>


5-7 years (average length of NFL career) at the vet minimum will enable you to take care of your family for the rest of your life???</P>


</P>


Current NFL minimum salaries</P>


1st year:* $375,000</P>


2nd year: $450.00</P>


3rd year: $525.000</P>


4th year: $600,000</P>


5th and 6th: $685,000</P>


So if a player played 6 years (splitting your 5-7 years) and only made the vet minimum, he would earn $3,320,000</P>


Anyone who makes that much money in their lives can definately "feed their family".* And if you make it in the first 6 years of your adulthood, you can actually continue to work and not retire at age 28.</P>


So yes, they can feed their family for life.</P>


*</P>


</P>


Guess that they don't pay taxes, huh?* Or agents?</P>


</P>


OK, take of $300,000 for agents.* And we all pay takes.</P>


But the basic notion that the NFL minimum won't "feed your family" is pure nonsense.</P>


Most of us would love to make $600,000 at age 26.</P>

Yeah but the idea of being set for life on 3.3 mil before taxes is ridiculous. Call it 1.5 mil, that is supposed to last you from 25 to 85? Considering inflation, you would need to manage your money very well and get a decent rate of return on your investments to even live modestly on that.

Sure if you have another job it's a completely different story, but that's not the point.

Kruunch
03-20-2012, 11:13 AM
These guys don't know the meaning of struggling to feed your family working three jobs. At least not anymore. These guys could all resign for the Vet Min and NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their family.</P>


5-7 years (average length of NFL career) at the vet minimum will enable you to take care of your family for the rest of your life???</P>


</P>


Current NFL minimum salaries</P>


1st year:* $375,000</P>


2nd year: $450.00</P>


3rd year: $525.000</P>


4th year: $600,000</P>


5th and 6th: $685,000</P>


So if a player played 6 years (splitting your 5-7 years) and only made the vet minimum, he would earn $3,320,000</P>


Anyone who makes that much money in their lives can definately "feed their family".* And if you make it in the first 6 years of your adulthood, you can actually continue to work and not retire at age 28.</P>


So yes, they can feed their family for life.</P>


*</P>


</P>


Guess that they don't pay taxes, huh?* Or agents?</P>


</P>


OK, take of $300,000 for agents.* And we all pay takes.</P>


But the basic notion that the NFL minimum won't "feed your family" is pure nonsense.</P>


Most of us would love to make $600,000 at age 26.</P>

Yeah but the idea of being set for life on 3.3 mil before taxes is ridiculous. Call it 1.5 mil, that is supposed to last you from 25 to 85? Considering inflation, you would need to manage your money very well and get a decent rate of return on your investments to even live modestly on that.

Sure if you have another job it's a completely different story, but that's not the point.

3 mil will give you a six figure income just on moderate investments.

Average household income in the U.S. is $34,000.

I think you could squeak by.

G-Men Surg.
03-20-2012, 11:14 AM
Good to hear that, glad he landed on his feet and hope nothing but the best for him and his family.

zimonami
03-20-2012, 11:17 AM
Thank you for your blood, sweat, and tears Aaron. You played with more motivation and heart than I expected this year, and I'm grateful that you stepped it up for your team mates and Giant fans.
Good luck.

jhamburg
03-20-2012, 11:21 AM
These guys don't know the meaning of struggling to feed your family working three jobs. At least not anymore. These guys could all resign for the Vet Min and NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their family.</P>


5-7 years (average length of NFL career) at the vet minimum will enable you to take care of your family for the rest of your life???</P>


</P>


Current NFL minimum salaries</P>


1st year:* $375,000</P>


2nd year: $450.00</P>


3rd year: $525.000</P>


4th year: $600,000</P>


5th and 6th: $685,000</P>


So if a player played 6 years (splitting your 5-7 years) and only made the vet minimum, he would earn $3,320,000</P>


Anyone who makes that much money in their lives can definately "feed their family".* And if you make it in the first 6 years of your adulthood, you can actually continue to work and not retire at age 28.</P>


So yes, they can feed their family for life.</P>


*</P>


</P>


Guess that they don't pay taxes, huh?* Or agents?</P>


</P>


OK, take of $300,000 for agents.* And we all pay takes.</P>


But the basic notion that the NFL minimum won't "feed your family" is pure nonsense.</P>


Most of us would love to make $600,000 at age 26.</P>

Yeah but the idea of being set for life on 3.3 mil before taxes is ridiculous. Call it 1.5 mil, that is supposed to last you from 25 to 85? Considering inflation, you would need to manage your money very well and get a decent rate of return on your investments to even live modestly on that.

Sure if you have another job it's a completely different story, but that's not the point.

3 mil will give you a six figure income just on moderate investments.

Average household income in the U.S. is $34,000.

I think you could squeak by.

I said 3 mil BEFORE taxes.

And consider inflation. 50K is fine now, but will be poverty line in 2060.

Coach Carter
03-20-2012, 11:26 AM
These guys don't know the meaning of struggling to feed your family working three jobs. At least not anymore. These guys could all resign for the Vet Min and NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their family.</P>


5-7 years (average length of NFL career) at the vet minimum will enable you to take care of your family for the rest of your life???</P>


</P>


Well, let's do the math. Let's say 6 years @ $350K.* That comes to $2,100,000.* According to this:</P>


http://www.mybudget360.com/how-much-does-the-average-american-make-breaking-down-the-us-household-income-numbers/</P>


The average income in the US is 46K.* So, 2.1 /46 = 45 years.</P>


Discuss.</P>

Come on man, about 50% of that money goes to the taxes, then the agent gets >10%.

So Ross is looking at about 40% of that money, if that much.

GMENAGAIN
03-20-2012, 11:29 AM
These guys don't know the meaning of struggling to feed your family working three jobs. At least not anymore. These guys could all resign for the Vet Min and NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their family.</P>


5-7 years (average length of NFL career) at the vet minimum will enable you to take care of your family for the rest of your life???</P>


</P>


Current NFL minimum salaries</P>


1st year: $375,000</P>


2nd year: $450.00</P>


3rd year: $525.000</P>


4th year: $600,000</P>


5th and 6th: $685,000</P>


So if a player played 6 years (splitting your 5-7 years) and only made the vet minimum, he would earn $3,320,000</P>


Anyone who makes that much money in their lives can definately "feed their family". And if you make it in the first 6 years of your adulthood, you can actually continue to work and not retire at age 28.</P>


So yes, they can feed their family for life.</P>


</P>


</P>


Guess that they don't pay taxes, huh? Or agents?</P>


</P>


OK, take of $300,000 for agents. And we all pay takes.</P>


But the basic notion that the NFL minimum won't "feed your family" is pure nonsense.</P>


Most of us would love to make $600,000 at age 26.</P>


Yeah but the idea of being set for life on 3.3 mil before taxes is ridiculous. Call it 1.5 mil, that is supposed to last you from 25 to 85? Considering inflation, you would need to manage your money very well and get a decent rate of return on your investments to even live modestly on that. Sure if you have another job it's a completely different story, but that's not the point. 3 mil will give you a six figure income just on moderate investments. Average household income in the U.S. is $34,000. I think you could squeak by.</P>


$3M after taxes is $1.5M or so. . . . . assuming that these twenty-something year old guys act completely unlike twenty-something year old guys and spend as if that money has to last them for the rest of their lives, that leaves about $40K per year until retirement (assuming age of retirementfrom NFL is 28 and age of retirement from all work is 65).</P>


Can you feed your family on $40K per year? Maybe, but it depends how big your family is and where you live. (Good luck feeding yor family for $40K per year in NY or Northern NJ). </P>


So the idea that guys who make the veteran minimum "NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their families" is pure nonsense.</P>


</P>

Coach Carter
03-20-2012, 11:29 AM
I liked Ross, too bad the Jets jumped in front of us to grab Revis.

Ross's fought through his mental issues and played well last season, after stinking it up since his second year.

nycisgreat
03-20-2012, 11:30 AM
Thank you Ross!! You deserve to feed your family. Good Luck!!

+1

GMENAGAIN
03-20-2012, 11:31 AM
These guys don't know the meaning of struggling to feed your family working three jobs. At least not anymore. These guys could all resign for the Vet Min and NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their family.</P>


5-7 years (average length of NFL career) at the vet minimum will enable you to take care of your family for the rest of your life???</P>


</P>


Current NFL minimum salaries</P>


1st year: $375,000</P>


2nd year: $450.00</P>


3rd year: $525.000</P>


4th year: $600,000</P>


5th and 6th: $685,000</P>


So if a player played 6 years (splitting your 5-7 years) and only made the vet minimum, he would earn $3,320,000</P>


Anyone who makes that much money in their lives can definately "feed their family". And if you make it in the first 6 years of your adulthood, you can actually continue to work and not retire at age 28.</P>


So yes, they can feed their family for life.</P>


</P>


</P>


you forgot uncle sam. Bonuses are taxed at around 40%. For roughly 2 million, you can keep your family alive. But let's not make it seem like they can live a "modest" life.all subjective of course. But i'd imagine they'd want to send their kids off to college. Even if you send them to a state school at 20k a year, if you have 2 kids, that's 200k right there. You can move to nowhere land Kentucky and buy a house for 100k. 10k a year on groceries times 50 is around 500k. If you buy a car every 10 years ..that's around 100k. Home repair is a ton. If i remember right, a roof is 20k. etc etc etc. Sports camps are crazy expensive. Playing an instrument can run you 10k a year easy. etc etc. the list goes on. Haha. Heck, even an iphone is 10k a year.</P>


So when the kid's are out of the nest, they won't have much left if anything at all.</P>




You're implying that after their NFL career they have to stop working?
</P>


The whole premise was that if you make the veteran minimum in the NFL, you NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding your family again . . . . so the idea of working after the NFL career is over is irrelevant. </P>

tuck&rolle
03-20-2012, 11:46 AM
I think that his performance in the super bowl flew way under the radar. Some of the tackles he made had some kind of ferocity to them... He was able to take his game up about 3 notches when he really wanted to. I don't know if anyone remembers the play where he blew up what would have been a great run play with one arm, but I definitely feel like Ross had one of his best games in his last as a Giant.

Happy trails Mr. Ross, good luck in Jacksonville.

swimeasy
03-20-2012, 12:12 PM
These guys don't know the meaning of struggling to feed your family working three jobs. At least not anymore. These guys could all resign for the Vet Min and NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their family.</p>


5-7 years (average length of NFL career) at the vet minimum will enable you to take care of your family for the rest of your life???</p>


</p>


Current NFL minimum salaries</p>


1st year: $375,000</p>


2nd year: $450.00</p>


3rd year: $525.000</p>


4th year: $600,000</p>


5th and 6th: $685,000</p>


So if a player played 6 years (splitting your 5-7 years) and only made the vet minimum, he would earn $3,320,000</p>


Anyone who makes that much money in their lives can definately "feed their family". And if you make it in the first 6 years of your adulthood, you can actually continue to work and not retire at age 28.</p>


So yes, they can feed their family for life.</p>


</p>


</p>


you forgot uncle sam. Bonuses are taxed at around 40%. For roughly 2 million, you can keep your family alive. But let's not make it seem like they can live a "modest" life.all subjective of course. But i'd imagine they'd want to send their kids off to college. Even if you send them to a state school at 20k a year, if you have 2 kids, that's 200k right there. You can move to nowhere land Kentucky and buy a house for 100k. 10k a year on groceries times 50 is around 500k. If you buy a car every 10 years ..that's around 100k. Home repair is a ton. If i remember right, a roof is 20k. etc etc etc. Sports camps are crazy expensive. Playing an instrument can run you 10k a year easy. etc etc. the list goes on. Haha. Heck, even an iphone is 10k a year.</p>


So when the kid's are out of the nest, they won't have much left if anything at all.</p>




You're implying that after their NFL career they have to stop working?
</p>


The whole premise was that if you make the veteran minimum in the NFL, you NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding your family again . . . . so the idea of working after the NFL career is over is irrelevant. </p>

I just wonder if we were talking about a person who worked in the financial services industry who worked hard and landed a good deal and it was said he deserved to feed his family if this whole conversation may have gone differently.

TroyArcher
03-20-2012, 12:15 PM
The Jags will be disappointed. He was a weak link all season. An average CB at best.

jhamburg
03-20-2012, 12:20 PM
These guys don't know the meaning of struggling to feed your family working three jobs. At least not anymore. These guys could all resign for the Vet Min and NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their family.</p>


5-7 years (average length of NFL career) at the vet minimum will enable you to take care of your family for the rest of your life???</p>


</p>


Current NFL minimum salaries</p>


1st year:* $375,000</p>


2nd year: $450.00</p>


3rd year: $525.000</p>


4th year: $600,000</p>


5th and 6th: $685,000</p>


So if a player played 6 years (splitting your 5-7 years) and only made the vet minimum, he would earn $3,320,000</p>


Anyone who makes that much money in their lives can definately "feed their family".* And if you make it in the first 6 years of your adulthood, you can actually continue to work and not retire at age 28.</p>


So yes, they can feed their family for life.</p>


*</p>


</p>


you forgot uncle sam.* Bonuses are taxed at around 40%.* For roughly 2 million, you can keep your family alive.* But let's not make it seem like they can live a "modest" life.***all subjective of course.* But i'd imagine they'd want to send their kids off to college.* Even if you send them to a state school at 20k a year, if you have 2 kids, that's 200k right there.* You can move to nowhere land Kentucky and buy a house for 100k.* 10k a year on groceries times 50 is around 500k.* If you buy a car every 10 years ..that's around 100k.* Home repair is a ton.* If i remember right, a roof is 20k. etc etc etc.* Sports camps are crazy expensive.* Playing an instrument can run you 10k a year easy. etc etc.* the list goes on.* Haha.* Heck, even an iphone is 10k a year.</p>


So when the kid's are out of the nest, they won't have much left if anything at all.</p>




You're implying that after their NFL career they have to stop working?
</p>


The whole premise was that if you make the veteran minimum in the NFL, you NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding your family again . . . . so the idea of working after the NFL career is over is irrelevant.* </p>

I just wonder if we were talking about a person who worked in the financial services industry who worked hard and landed a good deal and it was said he deserved to feed his family if this whole conversation may have gone differently.


That analogy doesn't work. The whole point is that NFL careers only last a few years, that doesn't apply to finance.

netplus
03-20-2012, 12:28 PM
"CB Aaron Ross to a three-year, $15.3 million contract."</P>


Ialmost choked when I read this. When a team spends this much for an average at best CB, they have no chance of competing with today's salary cap. They also still think Gabbert is going to be a franchise QB. Good luck!</P>

Kruunch
03-20-2012, 12:36 PM
The tax bracket for over $379,000 in annual income is about 35% (not 50%).

NFL agents make about 5% of the base contract.

Vet minimum is %685,000 (4-6 years of service) and $810,000 (for 7-9 years).

3 years at vet minimum (assuming second contract only) is $2,055,000.

After agent fees (at 5%): $1,952,250.

After taxes (at 35% with no deductions (heh)): $1,268,963

At $100,000 in living expenses per year for those 3 years (triple the national average householld income): $968,000 net.

Moderate yield conservative investment (basic middle of the road conservative mutual at 6%): $58,137 annual income (assuming you never add to the principle).

After taxes (25% at that bracket): $43,603 per year net on investment interest.

You would be netting about 33% more then the gross national average household annual income.

And that's pretty much the worst case scenario.

Now we can argue the definition of "set for life", standards of living and the spending habits of your average 20/30-something year old but you could definitely live on the income alone from a 3 year vet minimum salary if you so chose.

P.S. - Inflation works both ways ... if cost of living goes up, so do your investments (generally speaking).

swimeasy
03-20-2012, 12:51 PM
These guys don't know the meaning of struggling to feed your family working three jobs. At least not anymore. These guys could all resign for the Vet Min and NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their family.</p>


5-7 years (average length of NFL career) at the vet minimum will enable you to take care of your family for the rest of your life???</p>


</p>


Current NFL minimum salaries</p>


1st year: $375,000</p>


2nd year: $450.00</p>


3rd year: $525.000</p>


4th year: $600,000</p>


5th and 6th: $685,000</p>


So if a player played 6 years (splitting your 5-7 years) and only made the vet minimum, he would earn $3,320,000</p>


Anyone who makes that much money in their lives can definately "feed their family". And if you make it in the first 6 years of your adulthood, you can actually continue to work and not retire at age 28.</p>


So yes, they can feed their family for life.</p>


</p>


</p>


you forgot uncle sam. Bonuses are taxed at around 40%. For roughly 2 million, you can keep your family alive. But let's not make it seem like they can live a "modest" life.all subjective of course. But i'd imagine they'd want to send their kids off to college. Even if you send them to a state school at 20k a year, if you have 2 kids, that's 200k right there. You can move to nowhere land Kentucky and buy a house for 100k. 10k a year on groceries times 50 is around 500k. If you buy a car every 10 years ..that's around 100k. Home repair is a ton. If i remember right, a roof is 20k. etc etc etc. Sports camps are crazy expensive. Playing an instrument can run you 10k a year easy. etc etc. the list goes on. Haha. Heck, even an iphone is 10k a year.</p>


So when the kid's are out of the nest, they won't have much left if anything at all.</p>




You're implying that after their NFL career they have to stop working?
</p>


The whole premise was that if you make the veteran minimum in the NFL, you NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding your family again . . . . so the idea of working after the NFL career is over is irrelevant. </p>

I just wonder if we were talking about a person who worked in the financial services industry who worked hard and landed a good deal and it was said he deserved to feed his family if this whole conversation may have gone differently.


That analogy doesn't work. The whole point is that NFL careers only last a few years, that doesn't apply to finance.

Actually, it does. My daughter was a Finance major, works in the industry and already I'm hearing tales of some of her classmates leaving since the competition is so brutal. And that's after 2 years post college and barely getting by salaries, not $600,000/yr. They took their experiences to other areas of work but they continued to work.

Pro NFL players also have opportunities to use their money wisely and parlay it into second careers and many have and are doing so.

This whole conversation began with a reasonable question as to if it was appropriate to attach "deserved to feed their families" as a rationalization for players landing lucrative deals and it would be inaccurate to assume that careers are short only in the NFL.

jhamburg
03-20-2012, 01:24 PM
The tax bracket for over $379,000 in annual income is about 35% (not 50%).

NFL agents make about 5% of the base contract.

Vet minimum is %685,000 (4-6 years of service) and $810,000 (for 7-9 years).

3 years at vet minimum (assuming second contract only) is $2,055,000.

After agent fees (at 5%): $1,952,250.

After taxes (at 35% with no deductions (heh)): $1,268,963

At $100,000 in living expenses per year for those 3 years (triple the national average householld income): $968,000 net.

Moderate yield conservative investment (basic middle of the road conservative mutual at 6%): $58,137 annual income (assuming you never add to the principle).

After taxes (25% at that bracket): $43,603 per year net on investment interest.

You would be netting about 33% more then the gross national average household annual income.

And that's pretty much the worst case scenario.

Now we can argue the definition of "set for life", standards of living and the spending habits of your average 20/30-something year old but you could definitely live on the income alone from a 3 year vet minimum salary if you so chose.

P.S. - Inflation works both ways ... if cost of living goes up, so do your investments (generally speaking).

That's only true if you're investing in things like stock market and real estate. If you're investing in safer instruments like bonds, money markets, etc....inflation always works against you. So you're 43,603 is fine now, but 50 years down the road its more like 15K.

and if you want to invest the money you're planning on living off of for the rest of your life all in stocks, GL to you, cause you're gonna need it.

jhamburg
03-20-2012, 01:26 PM
These guys don't know the meaning of struggling to feed your family working three jobs. At least not anymore. These guys could all resign for the Vet Min and NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their family.</p>


5-7 years (average length of NFL career) at the vet minimum will enable you to take care of your family for the rest of your life???</p>


</p>


Current NFL minimum salaries</p>


1st year:* $375,000</p>


2nd year: $450.00</p>


3rd year: $525.000</p>


4th year: $600,000</p>


5th and 6th: $685,000</p>


So if a player played 6 years (splitting your 5-7 years) and only made the vet minimum, he would earn $3,320,000</p>


Anyone who makes that much money in their lives can definately "feed their family".* And if you make it in the first 6 years of your adulthood, you can actually continue to work and not retire at age 28.</p>


So yes, they can feed their family for life.</p>


*</p>


</p>


you forgot uncle sam.* Bonuses are taxed at around 40%.* For roughly 2 million, you can keep your family alive.* But let's not make it seem like they can live a "modest" life.***all subjective of course.* But i'd imagine they'd want to send their kids off to college.* Even if you send them to a state school at 20k a year, if you have 2 kids, that's 200k right there.* You can move to nowhere land Kentucky and buy a house for 100k.* 10k a year on groceries times 50 is around 500k.* If you buy a car every 10 years ..that's around 100k.* Home repair is a ton.* If i remember right, a roof is 20k. etc etc etc.* Sports camps are crazy expensive.* Playing an instrument can run you 10k a year easy. etc etc.* the list goes on.* Haha.* Heck, even an iphone is 10k a year.</p>


So when the kid's are out of the nest, they won't have much left if anything at all.</p>




You're implying that after their NFL career they have to stop working?
</p>


The whole premise was that if you make the veteran minimum in the NFL, you NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding your family again . . . . so the idea of working after the NFL career is over is irrelevant.* </p>

I just wonder if we were talking about a person who worked in the financial services industry who worked hard and landed a good deal and it was said he deserved to feed his family if this whole conversation may have gone differently.


That analogy doesn't work. The whole point is that NFL careers only last a few years, that doesn't apply to finance.

Actually, it does. My daughter was a Finance major, works in the industry and already I'm hearing tales of some of her classmates leaving since the competition is so brutal. And that's after 2 years post college and barely getting by salaries, not $600,000/yr.* They took their experiences to other areas of work but they continued to work.

Pro NFL players also have opportunities to use their money wisely and parlay it into second careers and many have and are doing so.

This whole conversation began with a reasonable question as to if it was appropriate to attach "deserved to feed their families" as a rationalization for players landing lucrative deals and it would be inaccurate to assume that careers are short only in the NFL.*




Well, yes, any career can be short if you quit your job....

swimeasy
03-20-2012, 01:30 PM
These guys don't know the meaning of struggling to feed your family working three jobs. At least not anymore. These guys could all resign for the Vet Min and NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their family.</p>


5-7 years (average length of NFL career) at the vet minimum will enable you to take care of your family for the rest of your life???</p>


</p>


Current NFL minimum salaries</p>


1st year: $375,000</p>


2nd year: $450.00</p>


3rd year: $525.000</p>


4th year: $600,000</p>


5th and 6th: $685,000</p>


So if a player played 6 years (splitting your 5-7 years) and only made the vet minimum, he would earn $3,320,000</p>


Anyone who makes that much money in their lives can definately "feed their family". And if you make it in the first 6 years of your adulthood, you can actually continue to work and not retire at age 28.</p>


So yes, they can feed their family for life.</p>


</p>


</p>


you forgot uncle sam. Bonuses are taxed at around 40%. For roughly 2 million, you can keep your family alive. But let's not make it seem like they can live a "modest" life.all subjective of course. But i'd imagine they'd want to send their kids off to college. Even if you send them to a state school at 20k a year, if you have 2 kids, that's 200k right there. You can move to nowhere land Kentucky and buy a house for 100k. 10k a year on groceries times 50 is around 500k. If you buy a car every 10 years ..that's around 100k. Home repair is a ton. If i remember right, a roof is 20k. etc etc etc. Sports camps are crazy expensive. Playing an instrument can run you 10k a year easy. etc etc. the list goes on. Haha. Heck, even an iphone is 10k a year.</p>


So when the kid's are out of the nest, they won't have much left if anything at all.</p>




You're implying that after their NFL career they have to stop working?
</p>


The whole premise was that if you make the veteran minimum in the NFL, you NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding your family again . . . . so the idea of working after the NFL career is over is irrelevant. </p>

I just wonder if we were talking about a person who worked in the financial services industry who worked hard and landed a good deal and it was said he deserved to feed his family if this whole conversation may have gone differently.


That analogy doesn't work. The whole point is that NFL careers only last a few years, that doesn't apply to finance.

Actually, it does. My daughter was a Finance major, works in the industry and already I'm hearing tales of some of her classmates leaving since the competition is so brutal. And that's after 2 years post college and barely getting by salaries, not $600,000/yr. They took their experiences to other areas of work but they continued to work.

Pro NFL players also have opportunities to use their money wisely and parlay it into second careers and many have and are doing so.

This whole conversation began with a reasonable question as to if it was appropriate to attach "deserved to feed their families" as a rationalization for players landing lucrative deals and it would be inaccurate to assume that careers are short only in the NFL.




Well, yes, any career can be short if you quit your job....

or you get cut

DownWitJPP
03-20-2012, 01:31 PM
I think that his performance in the super bowl flew way under the radar. Some of the tackles he made had some kind of ferocity to them... He was able to take his game up about 3 notches when he really wanted to. I don't know if anyone remembers the play where he blew up what would have been a great run play with one arm, but I definitely feel like Ross had one of his best games in his last as a Giant.

Happy trails Mr. Ross, good luck in Jacksonville.
agreed, he played well in the playoffs and superbowl. I wish we had that kind of play from him all the time. anyway good luck in Jacksonville Ross, once a Giant always a Giant

nygsb42champs
03-20-2012, 01:43 PM
I am glad he got 2 rings already because he won't be receiving anymore for a long time with that team.

Kruunch
03-20-2012, 01:52 PM
The tax bracket for over $379,000 in annual income is about 35% (not 50%).

NFL agents make about 5% of the base contract.

Vet minimum is %685,000 (4-6 years of service) and $810,000 (for 7-9 years).

3 years at vet minimum (assuming second contract only) is $2,055,000.

After agent fees (at 5%): $1,952,250.

After taxes (at 35% with no deductions (heh)): $1,268,963

At $100,000 in living expenses per year for those 3 years (triple the national average householld income): $968,000 net.

Moderate yield conservative investment (basic middle of the road conservative mutual at 6%): $58,137 annual income (assuming you never add to the principle).

After taxes (25% at that bracket): $43,603 per year net on investment interest.

You would be netting about 33% more then the gross national average household annual income.

And that's pretty much the worst case scenario.

Now we can argue the definition of "set for life", standards of living and the spending habits of your average 20/30-something year old but you could definitely live on the income alone from a 3 year vet minimum salary if you so chose.

P.S. - Inflation works both ways ... if cost of living goes up, so do your investments (generally speaking).

That's only true if you're investing in things like stock market and real estate. If you're investing in safer instruments like bonds, money markets, etc....inflation always works against you. So you're 43,603 is fine now, but 50 years down the road its more like 15K.

and if you want to invest the money you're planning on living off of for the rest of your life all in stocks, GL to you, cause you're gonna need it.

Ok now you're just arguing to argue (that and you apparently didn't read past the first and last sentence of what I posted).

As I've pointed out, you can certainly feed your family on a 3 year vet minimum salary for the rest of your life if you're smart with your money.

Then again, if you want your family to eat lobster vs. Hamburger Helper ... that's a different story.

In the context of what we're talking about, the rationale of "I need to support my family for the rest of my life off of this contract" is a fallacy. You can certainly work after your short NFL career and most people don't feed their families ad infinum (eventually kids grow up and get jobs yada yada yada).

And it isn't the province of the NFL to support your family for life.

This is just all hyperbole to "I want more money". Which is fine ... but let's say what we're really talking about here.

P.S. - While I think the Jags overpaid for Ross, you always overpay in FA and the CB is a highly coveted position in the NFL currently.

Morehead State
03-20-2012, 02:18 PM
I'm sorry, but for those people who are saying that you can't "feed your family" on $3MM earned in a lifetime are rediculous.</P>


Thats more money than most people will earn in their entire lives.</P>

Kruunch
03-20-2012, 02:19 PM
I'm sorry, but for those people who are saying that you can't "feed your family" on $3MM earned in a lifetime are rediculous.</P>


Thats more money than most people will earn in their entire lives.</P>

I just skipped lunch.

Maybe there's something to that after all. http://boards.giants.com/emoticons/emotion-8.gif

GameTime
03-20-2012, 02:29 PM
So this thread is SUPPOSED to be about Arron Ross goin gto the Jags. </P>


It turns out to be a pissing contest of Business/Econ 101 knowledge...</P>


ah....the boredom of the off season....lol</P>

G-ManSB42
03-20-2012, 02:35 PM
I am glad Ross got a big deal. He really had a great year when we absolutely needed him to. I always liked him. Nothing but the best to him and his wife!

GMENAGAIN
03-20-2012, 02:43 PM
I'm sorry, but for those people who are saying that you can't "feed your family" on $3MM earned in a lifetime are rediculous.</P>


Thats more money than most people will earn in their entire lives.</P>


</P>


You probably could if you followed the economic strategies set forth in excruciatingly boring detail below, but let's be real . . . . . what percentage of players with non-descript 5-7 year careers in the NFL actually do that? </P>

Kingb50
03-20-2012, 02:44 PM
Good Luck Ross!

Kingb50
03-20-2012, 02:44 PM
Good Luck Ross!

freeoscar
03-20-2012, 02:48 PM
I'm sorry, but for those people who are saying that you can't "feed your family" on $3MM earned in a lifetime are rediculous.</P>


Thats more money than most people will earn in their entire lives.</P>

The difference is that you are taxed much more heavily when the income comes in just a few short years, so net you end up with a lot less money than if it were spread out over your lifetime.

also, when you are making $600k/yr, and your peers are also making hundreds of thousands or millions per year, its pretty unrealistic to think you will live on just $50k/yr.

nhpgiantsfan
03-20-2012, 02:57 PM
I'm sorry, but for those people who are saying that you can't "feed your family" on $3MM earned in a lifetime are rediculous.</P>


Thats more money than most people will earn in their entire lives.</P>


</P>


It's really not that much. If you earned $100k annnually and worked for 30 years. That's 3 million. I'm sorry but living in a suburb of NY with a couple kids, $100k barely cuts it. You wouldnt starve on 3million for a lifetime, but you certainly wouldn't be well off.</P>

Kruunch
03-20-2012, 03:07 PM
I'm sorry, but for those people who are saying that you can't "feed your family" on $3MM earned in a lifetime are rediculous.</P>


Thats more money than most people will earn in their entire lives.</P>

The difference is that you are taxed much more heavily when the income comes in just a few short years, so net you end up with a lot less money than if it were spread out over your lifetime.

also, when you are making $600k/yr, and your peers are also making hundreds of thousands or millions per year, its pretty unrealistic to think you will live on just $50k/yr.

Absolutely true.

Then again, MC Hammer proved that $30 million wasn't enough to live on either.

Morehead State
03-20-2012, 03:14 PM
I'm sorry, but for those people who are saying that you can't "feed your family" on $3MM earned in a lifetime are rediculous.</P>


Thats more money than most people will earn in their entire lives.</P>


</P>


It's really not that much. If you earned $100k annnually and worked for 30 years. That's 3 million. I'm sorry but living in a suburb of NY with a couple kids, $100k barely cuts it. You wouldnt starve on 3million for a lifetime, but you certainly wouldn't be well off.</P>


</P>


Please spare me.</P>

TheEnigma
03-20-2012, 03:17 PM
There are places outside of the Northeast where you can move and live. Just throwing that out there.

miked1958
03-20-2012, 03:26 PM
These guys don't know the meaning of struggling to feed your family working three jobs. At least not anymore. These guys could all resign for the Vet Min and NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their family.</P>


5-7 years (average length of NFL career) at the vet minimum will enable you to take care of your family for the rest of your life???</P>guess all the other guys answered it for me. I agree with them. to many times i hear these NFL players saying they have to feed their family. I know its a figure of speech but please. use some different words to discribe it. These guys cant relate to what the average American is going through in this economy.

miked1958
03-20-2012, 03:27 PM
These guys don't know the meaning of struggling to feed your family working three jobs. At least not anymore. These guys could all resign for the Vet Min and NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their family.</P>


5-7 years (average length of NFL career) at the vet minimum will enable you to take care of your family for the rest of your life???</P>


</P>


Current NFL minimum salaries</P>


1st year: $375,000</P>


2nd year: $450.00</P>


3rd year: $525.000</P>


4th year: $600,000</P>


5th and 6th: $685,000</P>


So if a player played 6 years (splitting your 5-7 years) and only made the vet minimum, he would earn $3,320,000</P>


Anyone who makes that much money in their lives can definately "feed their family". And if you make it in the first 6 years of your adulthood, you can actually continue to work and not retire at age 28.</P>


So yes, they can feed their family for life.</P>


</P>




plus most got a free edumacation from the college schoool
</P>


i would love to make the VET MIN for the next 5-7 yrs. Trust me I would parlay that into a great lfe for my family for a number of years to come</P>

Morehead State
03-20-2012, 03:32 PM
There are places outside of the Northeast where you can move and live. Just throwing that out there.</P>


This entire convo is silly. Some guy wrote "congrats to Ross for feeding his family". Someone else commented on how foolish a post that was. And it was.</P>


Come on people. these guys are interested in living "the life". Feeding the family was taken care of a long, long time ago.</P>


We are talking about pro athletes who make millions of dollars. To suggest that there is a "feeding the family" consideration is silly.</P>

GameTime
03-20-2012, 03:45 PM
There are places outside of the Northeast where you can move and live. Just throwing that out there.</P>


This entire convo is silly. Some guy wrote "congrats to Ross for feeding his family". Someone else commented on how foolish a post that was. And it was.</P>


Come on people. these guys are interested in living "the life". Feeding the family was taken care of a long, long time ago.</P>


We are talking about pro athletes who make millions of dollars. To suggest that there is a "feeding the family" consideration is silly.</P>


</P>


maybe he has a REALLY big family....</P>


just sayin'...</P>


[:D]</P>

jhamburg
03-20-2012, 03:45 PM
There are places outside of the Northeast where you can move and live. Just throwing that out there.</P>


This entire convo is silly.* Some guy wrote "congrats to Ross for feeding his family".* Someone else commented on how foolish a post that was.* And it was.</P>


Come on people.* these guys are interested in living "the life".* Feeding the family was taken care of a long, long time ago.</P>


We are talking about pro athletes who make millions of dollars.* To suggest that there is a "feeding the family" consideration is silly.</P>

There is a grey area between "living the life" and "feeding your family"....trust me, if you try to live anything beyond a basic lifestyle with a couple million dollars to last you the rest of your life at 26, and you WILL go broke. Just ask anyone who's won the lottery, gotten an inheritance, etc.

Morehead State
03-20-2012, 03:49 PM
There are places outside of the Northeast where you can move and live. Just throwing that out there.</P>


This entire convo is silly. Some guy wrote "congrats to Ross for feeding his family". Someone else commented on how foolish a post that was. And it was.</P>


Come on people. these guys are interested in living "the life". Feeding the family was taken care of a long, long time ago.</P>


We are talking about pro athletes who make millions of dollars. To suggest that there is a "feeding the family" consideration is silly.</P>


There is a grey area between "living the life" and "feeding your family"....trust me, if you try to live anything beyond a basic lifestyle with a couple million dollars to last you the rest of your life at 26, and you WILL go broke. Just ask anyone who's won the lottery, gotten an inheritance, etc.</P>


There is the Grand Canyon, not a grey area at all.</P>

Kruunch
03-20-2012, 03:56 PM
There are places outside of the Northeast where you can move and live. Just throwing that out there.</P>


This entire convo is silly. Some guy wrote "congrats to Ross for feeding his family". Someone else commented on how foolish a post that was. And it was.</P>


Come on people. these guys are interested in living "the life". Feeding the family was taken care of a long, long time ago.</P>


We are talking about pro athletes who make millions of dollars. To suggest that there is a "feeding the family" consideration is silly.</P>


</P>


maybe he has a REALLY big family....</P>


just sayin'...</P>


[:D]</P>

*cough* Antonio Cromartie *cough*

Kruunch
03-20-2012, 03:57 PM
There are places outside of the Northeast where you can move and live. Just throwing that out there.</P>


This entire convo is silly.* Some guy wrote "congrats to Ross for feeding his family".* Someone else commented on how foolish a post that was.* And it was.</P>


Come on people.* these guys are interested in living "the life".* Feeding the family was taken care of a long, long time ago.</P>


We are talking about pro athletes who make millions of dollars.* To suggest that there is a "feeding the family" consideration is silly.</P>

There is a grey area between "living the life" and "feeding your family"....trust me, if you try to live anything beyond a basic lifestyle with a couple million dollars to last you the rest of your life at 26, and you WILL go broke. Just ask anyone who's won the lottery, gotten an inheritance, etc.

You would be dead wrong.

I say that from personal experience and $2 million dollars worth of capital.

Of course it depends on what you consider "living the life". A Ferrari for everyday of the week? No. 4-6 weeks a year abroad and not sweating 4 star restaurants or your kids' college funds? Yes.

egyptian420
03-20-2012, 03:58 PM
You'd think Ross is Revis if you read the Jags' forum....they'll be in for a rude awakening.

I still like Ross though, he was a good Giant and stepped up when we desperately needed him to.

jhamburg
03-20-2012, 04:24 PM
There are places outside of the Northeast where you can move and live. Just throwing that out there.</P>


This entire convo is silly.* Some guy wrote "congrats to Ross for feeding his family".* Someone else commented on how foolish a post that was.* And it was.</P>


Come on people.* these guys are interested in living "the life".* Feeding the family was taken care of a long, long time ago.</P>


We are talking about pro athletes who make millions of dollars.* To suggest that there is a "feeding the family" consideration is silly.</P>

There is a grey area between "living the life" and "feeding your family"....trust me, if you try to live anything beyond a basic lifestyle with a couple million dollars to last you the rest of your life at 26, and you WILL go broke. Just ask anyone who's won the lottery, gotten an inheritance, etc.

You would be dead wrong.

I say that from personal experience and $2 million dollars worth of capital.

Of course it depends on what you consider "living the life". A Ferrari for everyday of the week? No. 4-6 weeks a year abroad and not sweating 4 star restaurants or your kids' college funds? Yes.

You have personal experience living on nothing but a $2 million dollar lump sum from 26 to 86 years old?

Kruunch
03-20-2012, 04:27 PM
There are places outside of the Northeast where you can move and live. Just throwing that out there.</P>


This entire convo is silly.* Some guy wrote "congrats to Ross for feeding his family".* Someone else commented on how foolish a post that was.* And it was.</P>


Come on people.* these guys are interested in living "the life".* Feeding the family was taken care of a long, long time ago.</P>


We are talking about pro athletes who make millions of dollars.* To suggest that there is a "feeding the family" consideration is silly.</P>

There is a grey area between "living the life" and "feeding your family"....trust me, if you try to live anything beyond a basic lifestyle with a couple million dollars to last you the rest of your life at 26, and you WILL go broke. Just ask anyone who's won the lottery, gotten an inheritance, etc.

You would be dead wrong.

I say that from personal experience and $2 million dollars worth of capital.

Of course it depends on what you consider "living the life". A Ferrari for everyday of the week? No. 4-6 weeks a year abroad and not sweating 4 star restaurants or your kids' college funds? Yes.

You have personal experience living on nothing but a $2 million dollar lump sum from 26 to 86 years old?

Yes.

Although you're being obtuse to the point of stupidity.

Of course this includes a career on top of the capital.

(who doesn't work for 60 years?!)

jhamburg
03-20-2012, 04:30 PM
There are places outside of the Northeast where you can move and live. Just throwing that out there.</P>


This entire convo is silly.* Some guy wrote "congrats to Ross for feeding his family".* Someone else commented on how foolish a post that was.* And it was.</P>


Come on people.* these guys are interested in living "the life".* Feeding the family was taken care of a long, long time ago.</P>


We are talking about pro athletes who make millions of dollars.* To suggest that there is a "feeding the family" consideration is silly.</P>

There is a grey area between "living the life" and "feeding your family"....trust me, if you try to live anything beyond a basic lifestyle with a couple million dollars to last you the rest of your life at 26, and you WILL go broke. Just ask anyone who's won the lottery, gotten an inheritance, etc.

You would be dead wrong.

I say that from personal experience and $2 million dollars worth of capital.

Of course it depends on what you consider "living the life". A Ferrari for everyday of the week? No. 4-6 weeks a year abroad and not sweating 4 star restaurants or your kids' college funds? Yes.

You have personal experience living on nothing but a $2 million dollar lump sum from 26 to 86 years old?

Yes.

Although you're being obtuse to the point of stupidity.

Of course this includes a career on top of the capital.

(who doesn't work for 60 years?!)

I'm not being obtuse, the whole f'n argument is that you have *nothing* but your 3-5 year NFL minimum salary to live on for the rest of your life.

If you get a 2nd career, than you don't need *any* money to live the rest of your life.

bearbryant
03-20-2012, 04:39 PM
Unless AR has had an epiphany he will return to the player who said " football isn't really the type of life he was interested in living! That he no longer could do it emotionally." That was second year in when he caught his first "real" injury. Out of the box I thought he'd be something
special or at least " very good" but after his rookie season he never looked the same, very inconsistent, and logically, too deep. Good luck, AR!

Kruunch
03-20-2012, 04:50 PM
There are places outside of the Northeast where you can move and live. Just throwing that out there.</P>


This entire convo is silly.* Some guy wrote "congrats to Ross for feeding his family".* Someone else commented on how foolish a post that was.* And it was.</P>


Come on people.* these guys are interested in living "the life".* Feeding the family was taken care of a long, long time ago.</P>


We are talking about pro athletes who make millions of dollars.* To suggest that there is a "feeding the family" consideration is silly.</P>

There is a grey area between "living the life" and "feeding your family"....trust me, if you try to live anything beyond a basic lifestyle with a couple million dollars to last you the rest of your life at 26, and you WILL go broke. Just ask anyone who's won the lottery, gotten an inheritance, etc.

You would be dead wrong.

I say that from personal experience and $2 million dollars worth of capital.

Of course it depends on what you consider "living the life". A Ferrari for everyday of the week? No. 4-6 weeks a year abroad and not sweating 4 star restaurants or your kids' college funds? Yes.

You have personal experience living on nothing but a $2 million dollar lump sum from 26 to 86 years old?

Yes.

Although you're being obtuse to the point of stupidity.

Of course this includes a career on top of the capital.

(who doesn't work for 60 years?!)

I'm not being obtuse, the whole f'n argument is that you have *nothing* but your 3-5 year NFL minimum salary to live on for the rest of your life.

If you get a 2nd career, than you don't need *any* money to live the rest of your life.

That's an asinine premise and not what I was referencing.

$100 billion wouldn't be enough to live on for the rest of your life if you spent it in one day.

What's the point?

zimonami
03-20-2012, 05:03 PM
There are places outside of the Northeast where you can move and live. Just throwing that out there.</P>


This entire convo is silly.* Some guy wrote "congrats to Ross for feeding his family".* Someone else commented on how foolish a post that was.* And it was.</P>


Come on people.* these guys are interested in living "the life".* Feeding the family was taken care of a long, long time ago.</P>


We are talking about pro athletes who make millions of dollars.* To suggest that there is a "feeding the family" consideration is silly.</P>


There is a grey area between "living the life" and "feeding your family"....trust me, if you try to live anything beyond a basic lifestyle with a couple million dollars to last you the rest of your life at 26, and you WILL go broke. Just ask anyone who's won the lottery, gotten an inheritance, etc.</P>


There is the Grand Canyon, not a grey area at all.</P>
Like Morehead said, this is really silly. Especially a premise that they'll never work again... at around 30?
Every single one of our Pro football, basketball, and baseball players can get an instant job back in the home town where they grew up. Auto sales, liquor distributors, or any other number of local merchants are always bending over backwards to get one of these guys working for them... just a fact since the 50's, when most of these players, in all sports, really did have to have a second job in their off-season.

zimonami
03-20-2012, 05:08 PM
Unless AR has had an epiphany he will return to the player who said " football isn't really the type of life he was interested in living! That he no longer could do it emotionally." That was second year in when he caught his first "real" injury. Out of the box I thought he'd be something
special or at least " very good" but after his rookie season he never looked the same, very inconsistent, and logically, too deep. Good luck, AR!
Absolutely dead on. After our loss to Washington the DB's would get together 3X a week, mostly at Phillip's home, to review tape and talk about working better together. It was about that time that they also asked Fewell to give them more Man coverage, especially to help Prince.. Anyways, it was around this time that Ross started to step up and play with more intensity than we had seen for several years. I think it was a pride thing, not wanting to let his buddies down. Anyways, he did step up. He had to, or we wouldn't have succeeded. I think he'll revert to his former uninspired play at Jax. What's his motivation when they're 2-6?

Coach Carter
03-20-2012, 06:39 PM
I am glad Ross got a big deal. He really had a great year when we absolutely needed him to. I always liked him. Nothing but the best to him and his wife!
+1

lawl
03-20-2012, 06:45 PM
Its about securing your kid's kid's kid's future. The more money you make now provides a greater chance that even more generations of your direct and extended family's success.</P>

NY4U2
03-20-2012, 06:53 PM
I am glad Ross got a big deal. He really had a great year when we absolutely needed him to. I always liked him. Nothing but the best to him and his wife!

+1

berya
03-20-2012, 08:03 PM
For a guy that started on two Super Bowl winning teams, he sure gets very little respect around here...


+1. Good luck Aaron Ross.

G.I. Ants
03-20-2012, 08:37 PM
For a guy that started on two Super Bowl winning teams, he sure gets very little respect around here...


+1. Good luck Aaron Ross.+1000, Aaron Ross has had a tough career with the injuries but he is a real competitor. Congrats on the nice contract and I wish him the best.

BigBlue1971
03-20-2012, 10:40 PM
I am glad he got 2 rings already because he won't be receiving anymore for a long time with that team.</P>


</P>


yea exactly! lol</P>


but he does take some clout down their with those two rings. he should be a factor in that locker room!</P>


good luck AR you made us proud.......<FONT size=1>and scared at times!!!</FONT></P>

Pop it Ahmad
03-20-2012, 10:50 PM
I hate seeing players we drafted leave. Props to Jerry Reese. Always loved Ross, despite his troubles.

This year he really played solid defense, especially in the playoffs. Good luck and congrats!

G-Man67
03-21-2012, 11:39 AM
good for Aaron ... that's how it should work ... he helped us win a Super Bowl and he got paid for it</P>


if TT is good to go, we'll be fine ... IF, but it's pretty obvious that you can't pay a player that was probably projected to bethe #4 CB $5MM / year or even if you put him ahead of Prince ... obviously you want to give Prince playing time as a #1 pick</P>


it's a business</P>

NYG 5
03-21-2012, 09:15 PM
These guys don't know the meaning of struggling to feed your family working three jobs. At least not anymore. These guys could all resign for the Vet Min and NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their family.</p>


5-7 years (average length of NFL career) at the vet minimum will enable you to take care of your family for the rest of your life???</p>

250k X 6 years, 1.5 mil. and im pretty sure that was the old league min.

some people do it on 30k X their whole life.

soldiers get beat up just as much in an average 6 year career and make 20-40k a year.

****ing stop with the players are poor. yeah, they don't get paid much compared to the entire NFL pie, but god dammit, if they don't like it they can go work the insignificant jobs the rest of us peasants have to work. BILLY JOE SMITH ONLY GETS PAID 700K A YEAR, HE DESERVES MORE MONEY, HOW CAN HE LIVE ON THAT? stfu and gtfo

George_Vreeland_Hill
03-21-2012, 09:46 PM
5.1 million per.
Not worth it.
Without the Giants D covering his ***, he will get burned like crazy.
They will dump him after one year.

GMENAGAIN
03-21-2012, 10:27 PM
These guys don't know the meaning of struggling to feed your family working three jobs. At least not anymore. These guys could all resign for the Vet Min and NEVER EVER have to worry about feeding their family.</P>


5-7 years (average length of NFL career) at the vet minimum will enable you to take care of your family for the rest of your life???</P>




250k X 6 years, 1.5 mil. and im pretty sure that was the old league min.

some people do it on 30k X their whole life.

soldiers get beat up just as much in an average 6 year career and make 20-40k a year.

****ing stop with the players are poor. yeah, they don't get paid much compared to the entire NFL pie, but god dammit, if they don't like it they can go work the insignificant jobs the rest of us peasants have to work. BILLY JOE SMITH ONLY GETS PAID 700K A YEAR, HE DESERVES MORE MONEY, HOW CAN HE LIVE ON THAT? stfu and gtfo
</P>


Math's not your thing, huh? Maybe that's why you're a "peasant" with an "insignificant" job??</P>


Just throwing it out there . . . . . </P>


</P>

JJC7301
03-21-2012, 10:53 PM
Hey, a serious good luck to Aaron. He played very well during our two SB runs and had a great rookie year. I feel that the only two things holding him back were his injuries and the rotating DC's every time he came back.

If he's healthy, he's a fine CB. I really believe that, but I know that we couldn't afford him along with Web, TT, and Prince.

w_mann5
03-22-2012, 02:38 AM
I had my fingers crossed when I saw Ross was visiting the Bengals. He will be a good fit with Rasheen Mathis.