PDA

View Full Version : Morris Claiborne scores a 4 on Wonderlic, worst since 2000



TuckYou
04-03-2012, 04:10 PM
In my opinion, Claiborne is the best defensive player in this draft and played very well in a very complex system at LSU. </P>


Weird.</P>


How can you score a 4 on this test and pass classes in college?</P>


Former LSU cornerback <FONT color=#225fb2>Morris Claiborne</FONT> (http://insider.espn.go.com/nfl/draft/player/_/id/27921/morris-claiborne), the highest rated cornerback in the NFL draft, scored a 4 out of 50 on the Wonderlic Test administered to prospects at the NFL Scouting Combine in February, sources confirmed to ESPN.</P>


Pro Football Talk first reported Claiborne's test score.</P>


Claiborne's score is the lowest known result by a draft prospect since Iowa State running back Darren Davis reportedly received a 4 in 2000. In 2006, quarterback <FONT color=#225fb2>Vince Young</FONT> (http://espn.go.com/nfl/player/_/id/9589/vince-young), who was the third overall pick by the <FONT color=#225fb2>Tennessee Titans</FONT> (http://espn.go.com/nfl/team/_/name/ten/tennessee-titans), reportedly scored a 6 on his initial test before retaking it and getting a 16. Quarterback <FONT color=#225fb2>Dan Marino</FONT> (http://espn.go.com/nfl/player/_/id/1/dan-marino) also scored a 16 and went on to a Hall of Fame career with the <FONT color=#225fb2>Miami Dolphins</FONT> (http://espn.go.com/nfl/team/_/name/mia/miami-dolphins).</P>


http://espn.go.com/nfl/draft2012/story/_/id/7770388/2012-nfl-draft-morris-claiborne-top-cb-prospect-scored-4-wonderlic-sources-say</P>


Claiborne could slip on draft day due to this.</P>


Could he slip into the 20s? Would the Giants be interested?</P>

Sundown
04-03-2012, 04:13 PM
How the hell will he be able to learn the playbook and read offensive schemes!!! Wow!!

ny06
04-03-2012, 04:16 PM
No way he falls just because he scored low on his Wonderlic Test. He has far too much talent for a team to discredit him. </P>


I never cared how smart these players are, if they can grasp a playbook and have talent that's all you need. These guys aren't running fortune 500 businesses. There playing a game...</P>

Kase-1
04-03-2012, 04:16 PM
#1. If you have 3 Apples and 5 Oranges, how many Apples do you have??

A. 3
B. 5
C. Apples
D. Red

IamGiantsfan
04-03-2012, 04:17 PM
#1. If you have 3 Apples and 5 Oranges, how many Apples do you have??

A. 3
B. 5
C. Apples
D. Red

uh red?

jomo
04-03-2012, 04:22 PM
In my opinion, Claiborne is the best defensive player in this draft and played very well in a very complex system at LSU. </P>


Weird.</P>


How can you score a 4 on this test and pass classes in college?</P>


Former LSU cornerback <FONT color=#225fb2>Morris Claiborne</FONT> (http://insider.espn.go.com/nfl/draft/player/_/id/27921/morris-claiborne), the highest rated cornerback in the NFL draft, scored a 4 out of 50 on the Wonderlic Test administered to prospects at the NFL Scouting Combine in February, sources confirmed to ESPN.</P>


Pro Football Talk first reported Claiborne's test score.</P>


Claiborne's score is the lowest known result by a draft prospect since Iowa State running back Darren Davis reportedly received a 4 in 2000. In 2006, quarterback <FONT color=#225fb2>Vince Young</FONT> (http://espn.go.com/nfl/player/_/id/9589/vince-young), who was the third overall pick by the <FONT color=#225fb2>Tennessee Titans</FONT> (http://espn.go.com/nfl/team/_/name/ten/tennessee-titans), reportedly scored a 6 on his initial test before retaking it and getting a 16. Quarterback <FONT color=#225fb2>Dan Marino</FONT> (http://espn.go.com/nfl/player/_/id/1/dan-marino) also scored a 16 and went on to a Hall of Fame career with the <FONT color=#225fb2>Miami Dolphins</FONT> (http://espn.go.com/nfl/team/_/name/mia/miami-dolphins).</P>


http://espn.go.com/nfl/draft2012/story/_/id/7770388/2012-nfl-draft-morris-claiborne-top-cb-prospect-scored-4-wonderlic-sources-say</P>


Claiborne could slip on draft day due to this.</P>


Could he slip into the 20s? Would the Giants be interested?</P>Marino was known for a strong arm but not for making good decisions with the ball. He and Favre were better known for trying to make an impossible pass and ending up with an interception. Regarding how a player can score 4 on the test and pass classes in colliege he is a star player at LSU. Enough said.

Kruunch
04-03-2012, 04:26 PM
In my opinion, Claiborne is the best defensive player in this draft and played very well in a very complex system at LSU. </P>


Weird.</P>


How can you score a 4 on this test and pass classes in college?</P>


Former LSU cornerback <FONT color=#225fb2>Morris Claiborne</FONT> (http://insider.espn.go.com/nfl/draft/player/_/id/27921/morris-claiborne), the highest rated cornerback in the NFL draft, scored a 4 out of 50 on the Wonderlic Test administered to prospects at the NFL Scouting Combine in February, sources confirmed to ESPN.</P>


Pro Football Talk first reported Claiborne's test score.</P>


Claiborne's score is the lowest known result by a draft prospect since Iowa State running back Darren Davis reportedly received a 4 in 2000. In 2006, quarterback <FONT color=#225fb2>Vince Young</FONT> (http://espn.go.com/nfl/player/_/id/9589/vince-young), who was the third overall pick by the <FONT color=#225fb2>Tennessee Titans</FONT> (http://espn.go.com/nfl/team/_/name/ten/tennessee-titans), reportedly scored a 6 on his initial test before retaking it and getting a 16. Quarterback <FONT color=#225fb2>Dan Marino</FONT> (http://espn.go.com/nfl/player/_/id/1/dan-marino) also scored a 16 and went on to a Hall of Fame career with the <FONT color=#225fb2>Miami Dolphins</FONT> (http://espn.go.com/nfl/team/_/name/mia/miami-dolphins).</P>


http://espn.go.com/nfl/draft2012/story/_/id/7770388/2012-nfl-draft-morris-claiborne-top-cb-prospect-scored-4-wonderlic-sources-say</P>


Claiborne could slip on draft day due to this.</P>


Could he slip into the 20s? Would the Giants be interested?</P>

He might slip a tad ... but most likely not out of the Top 10.

The Wonderlic test doesn't seem to be as big a deal as it used to be as an NFL measurable and CB is almost a purely athletic position.

Kruunch
04-03-2012, 04:26 PM
#1. If you have 3 Apples and 5 Oranges, how many Apples do you have??

A. 3
B. 5
C. Apples
D. Red


Lol nice [b]

TuckYou
04-03-2012, 04:27 PM
Wow, just read that Patrick Peterson got a 5... Those LSU boys aren't that smart huh? No wonder the SEC needs to pay there players to go there and pay off their professors to keep them playing. CWeb at least got a 12.</P>

Roxersboxers
04-03-2012, 04:30 PM
i heard you get four points just by signing your name.

TheEnigma
04-03-2012, 04:37 PM
#1. If you have 3 Apples and 5 Oranges, how many Apples do you have??

A. 3
B. 5
C. Apples
D. Red
I'd like to phone a friend please.

TuckYou
04-03-2012, 04:42 PM
#1. If you have 3 Apples and 5 Oranges, how many Apples do you have??

A. 3
B. 5
C. Apples
D. Red
</P>


https://encrypted-tbn0.google.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRCsHtfgb8yeWVmeRz4I5iUbgVmC30_F 02RtV88crrbCG58uC2MPA</P>

slipknottin
04-03-2012, 04:54 PM
He probably cant read.

Or perhaps he fell asleep during the quiz.

Doubt he drops much. But it will keep him from ever becoming an elite player.

Morehead State
04-03-2012, 05:05 PM
In my opinion, Claiborne is the best defensive player in this draft and played very well in a very complex system at LSU. </P>


Weird.</P>


How can you score a 4 on this test and pass classes in college?</P>


Former LSU cornerback <FONT color=#225fb2>Morris Claiborne</FONT> (http://insider.espn.go.com/nfl/draft/player/_/id/27921/morris-claiborne), the highest rated cornerback in the NFL draft, scored a 4 out of 50 on the Wonderlic Test administered to prospects at the NFL Scouting Combine in February, sources confirmed to ESPN.</P>


Pro Football Talk first reported Claiborne's test score.</P>


Claiborne's score is the lowest known result by a draft prospect since Iowa State running back Darren Davis reportedly received a 4 in 2000. In 2006, quarterback <FONT color=#225fb2>Vince Young</FONT> (http://espn.go.com/nfl/player/_/id/9589/vince-young), who was the third overall pick by the <FONT color=#225fb2>Tennessee Titans</FONT> (http://espn.go.com/nfl/team/_/name/ten/tennessee-titans), reportedly scored a 6 on his initial test before retaking it and getting a 16. Quarterback <FONT color=#225fb2>Dan Marino</FONT> (http://espn.go.com/nfl/player/_/id/1/dan-marino) also scored a 16 and went on to a Hall of Fame career with the <FONT color=#225fb2>Miami Dolphins</FONT> (http://espn.go.com/nfl/team/_/name/mia/miami-dolphins).</P>


http://espn.go.com/nfl/draft2012/story/_/id/7770388/2012-nfl-draft-morris-claiborne-top-cb-prospect-scored-4-wonderlic-sources-say</P>


Claiborne could slip on draft day due to this.</P>


Could he slip into the 20s? Would the Giants be interested?</P>


Marino was known for a strong arm but not for making good decisions with the ball. He and Favre were better known for trying to make an impossible pass and ending up with an interception. Regarding how a player can score 4 on the test and pass classes in colliege he is a star player at LSU. Enough said.</P>


Let me first say that you are a really good poster.</P>


Now let me say that your point about Dan Marino is completely silly.. Dan Marino ran a complex offense and ran it beautifully. He most certainly did NOT have any kind of reputation as a guy who made bad decisions. And the whole "bad decision" rap on any QB has nothing to do with the kinds of decisions made on the Wonderlic test. The "decision" to throw a pass and to whom is a reaction more than a decision. It comes from hours and hours (or years really) of play. Repetition. Its not a thoughful decision at all.</P>


And Bill Polian was on NFL Sirius talking about this kid from LSU. He said that score means NOTHING. It usually comes from a reading problem which has nothing to do with playing football. As evidenced by the fact that the kid is a great football player. He said that 99% of the time it has no effect on the kids play.</P>


He will not drop in the draft.</P>

NY4U2
04-03-2012, 05:19 PM
lol some people just blow it on tests.They are smart people but something about tests that make em freak out. NBot saying this is defiantly the case but could be...and its only 2 apples cus Claiborne ate 1 during the test

TroyArcher
04-03-2012, 05:30 PM
#1. If you have 3 Apples and 5 Oranges, how many Apples do you have??

A. 3
B. 5
C. Apples
D. Red
</P>


My head hurts</P>

TroyArcher
04-03-2012, 05:32 PM
In my opinion, Claiborne is the best defensive player in this draft and played very well in a very complex system at LSU. </P>


Weird.</P>


How can you score a 4 on this test and pass classes in college?</P>


Former LSU cornerback <FONT color=#225fb2>Morris Claiborne</FONT> (http://insider.espn.go.com/nfl/draft/player/_/id/27921/morris-claiborne), the highest rated cornerback in the NFL draft, scored a 4 out of 50 on the Wonderlic Test administered to prospects at the NFL Scouting Combine in February, sources confirmed to ESPN.</P>


Pro Football Talk first reported Claiborne's test score.</P>


Claiborne's score is the lowest known result by a draft prospect since Iowa State running back Darren Davis reportedly received a 4 in 2000. In 2006, quarterback <FONT color=#225fb2>Vince Young</FONT> (http://espn.go.com/nfl/player/_/id/9589/vince-young), who was the third overall pick by the <FONT color=#225fb2>Tennessee Titans</FONT> (http://espn.go.com/nfl/team/_/name/ten/tennessee-titans), reportedly scored a 6 on his initial test before retaking it and getting a 16. Quarterback <FONT color=#225fb2>Dan Marino</FONT> (http://espn.go.com/nfl/player/_/id/1/dan-marino) also scored a 16 and went on to a Hall of Fame career with the <FONT color=#225fb2>Miami Dolphins</FONT> (http://espn.go.com/nfl/team/_/name/mia/miami-dolphins).</P>


http://espn.go.com/nfl/draft2012/story/_/id/7770388/2012-nfl-draft-morris-claiborne-top-cb-prospect-scored-4-wonderlic-sources-say</P>


Claiborne could slip on draft day due to this.</P>


Could he slip into the 20s? Would the Giants be interested?</P>


</P>


</P>


Hakeem scored an 11 and he is not too shabby.</P>

B&RWarrior
04-03-2012, 05:34 PM
Everyone is so enamored with intelligence. Not just in sports but in everyday society. The reality is that in most cases you need a baseline level of intelligence to be competent at whatever you do, but beyond that effort, passion, experience, persistence, situational politics and a list of other intangibles is what it takes to succeed. This applies if your an investment banker or a cornerback in the NFL.

NFL success is usually about instincts, athletic ability, discipline, and durability- proficiency in these areas is not predicated on intelligence.

Whether or not Claiborne succeeds or fails it will be unrelated to his his intelligence level.

slipknottin
04-03-2012, 05:36 PM
Whether or not Claiborne succeeds or fails it will be unrelated to his his intelligence level.

Its not a pass or fail thing though.

Look at Manningham, tested very poorly on the wonderlic, while he is a good receiver, the one thing that always pops up with him is that he made mental mistakes. Those mental mistakes are probably what is preventing him from becoming an even better player.

hungrrrry
04-03-2012, 05:44 PM
#1. If you have 3 Apples and 5 Oranges, how many Apples do you have??

A. 3
B. 5
C. Apples
D. Red
an accordian!?

B&RWarrior
04-03-2012, 05:59 PM
Whether or not Claiborne succeeds or fails it will be unrelated to his his intelligence level.

Its not a pass or fail thing though.

Look at Manningham, tested very poorly on the wonderlic, while he is a good receiver, the one thing that always pops up with him is that he made mental mistakes. Those mental mistakes are probably what is preventing him from becoming an even better player.

MM was my example of why the Wonderlic isn't a good barometer of a player's ability to succeed in the NFL. MM had a low wonderlic score, yet by every account he's a good WR. He was prone to running the wrong route on plays, but that could have been from a lack of preparation and had nothing to do with his mental make up.

slipknottin
04-03-2012, 06:21 PM
MM had a low wonderlic score, yet by every account he's a good WR. He was prone to running the wrong route on plays, but that could have been from a lack of preparation and had nothing to do with his mental make up.

Yea... Good, as oppossed to great. I think the lack of preparation or whatever other mental issues he has are related...

You can look at someone like Revis, and say its just physical, and instincts, and he doesnt have to be that smart.... and then you can look at it this way... Revis prepares, studies, watches more film than any other CB in the league. A HUGE part of football is mental, at every position. Intelligence, or lack there of, while may not make or break a player, absolutely plays a role in how good or bad a player may be.

BeatYale
04-03-2012, 06:29 PM
No way he falls just because he scored low on is Wonderlic Test. He has far too much talent for a team to discredit him. </P>


I never cared how smart these players are, if they can grasp a playbook and have talent that's all you need. These guys aren't running fortune 500 businesses. There playing a game...</P>

These players are not full time athletes in college. They are part time athletes and full time students. A low or high wonderlic says something about their character and work ethic. It's about determining the kind of individual you're bringing into your organization.

Someone who scores this low on such a simple test is practically a ******.

GIANTfaninFL
04-03-2012, 06:34 PM
He probably cant read.

Or perhaps he fell asleep during the quiz.

Doubt he drops much. But it will keep him from ever becoming an elite player.

That is ridiculous. You have no basis for making that statement

Axels15
04-03-2012, 06:49 PM
I remember a recent article about the Giants cornerbacks that said most have low wonderlics, and the article drew the connection to short memory span, not focused on bad plays.

I'll say this - He's not falling cause of the low score

B&RWarrior
04-03-2012, 06:49 PM
MM had a low wonderlic score, yet by every account he's a good WR. He was prone to running the wrong route on plays, but that could have been from a lack of preparation and had nothing to do with his mental make up.

Yea... Good, as oppossed to great. I think the lack of preparation or whatever other mental issues he has are related...

You can look at someone like Revis, and say its just physical, and instincts, and he doesnt have to be that smart.... and then you can look at it this way... Revis prepares, studies, watches more film than any other CB in the league. A HUGE part of football is mental, at every position. Intelligence, or lack there of, while may not make or break a player, absolutely plays a role in how good or bad a player may be.

Your making my argument for me. I think how we define intelligence is where you and I differ. The way Revis prepares, studies, and watches more film than any other CB in the league is a sign of his discipline, focus, and dedication. IMO it is not a sign of intelligence.

For example most would attribute Jerry Rice's success more to his work ethic than to his intelligence. Especially when your talking about players intelligence takes a back seat to ability and preparation. The really good coaches are usually very intelligent, but they were also usually just average players. Success in the NFL is about ability and dedication.

B&RWarrior
04-03-2012, 06:53 PM
I remember a recent article about the Giants cornerbacks that said most have low wonderlics, and the article drew the connection to short memory span, not focused on bad plays.

I'll say this - He's not falling cause of the low score

You bring up a good point about memory. I think positions that require players to memorize a lot of information relative to other positions and make decision based on that info may be where intelligence plays it's biggest role in football. I'm referring to S, MLB, QB, C.

hugehomer
04-03-2012, 07:02 PM
Who told you he was really taking tests?

slipknottin
04-03-2012, 07:06 PM
IMO it is not a sign of intelligence.

I tend to believe that the ability to learn, recall, and utilize information is "intelligence"

All that film work players do is useless to a player that cant recall anything when the game starts.

B&RWarrior
04-03-2012, 07:18 PM
IMO it is not a sign of intelligence.

I tend to believe that the ability to learn, recall, and utilize information is "intelligence"

All that film work players do is useless to a player that cant recall anything when the game starts.

Your assuming the players that can't recall the plays like a Revis can actually do the film work. I'd bet money that they don't. That means its their work ethic not their intelligence that's in question.

Like I said you have a point about intelligence at positions like MLB, QB, S, C where there are extreme amounts of play diagnosis, leadership duties, audibles, etc.

slipknottin
04-03-2012, 07:43 PM
Your assuming the players that can't recall the plays like a Revis can actually do the film work. I'd bet money that they don't. That means its their work ethic not their intelligence that's in question.

Its both. If you arent bright enough to learn and remember things, there isnt much of a point to do extra film work.

jomo
04-03-2012, 07:51 PM
In my opinion, Claiborne is the best defensive player in this draft and played very well in a very complex system at LSU. </P>


Weird.</P>


How can you score a 4 on this test and pass classes in college?</P>


Former LSU cornerback <FONT color=#225fb2>Morris Claiborne</FONT> (http://insider.espn.go.com/nfl/draft/player/_/id/27921/morris-claiborne), the highest rated cornerback in the NFL draft, scored a 4 out of 50 on the Wonderlic Test administered to prospects at the NFL Scouting Combine in February, sources confirmed to ESPN.</P>


Pro Football Talk first reported Claiborne's test score.</P>


Claiborne's score is the lowest known result by a draft prospect since Iowa State running back Darren Davis reportedly received a 4 in 2000. In 2006, quarterback <FONT color=#225fb2>Vince Young</FONT> (http://espn.go.com/nfl/player/_/id/9589/vince-young), who was the third overall pick by the <FONT color=#225fb2>Tennessee Titans</FONT> (http://espn.go.com/nfl/team/_/name/ten/tennessee-titans), reportedly scored a 6 on his initial test before retaking it and getting a 16. Quarterback <FONT color=#225fb2>Dan Marino</FONT> (http://espn.go.com/nfl/player/_/id/1/dan-marino) also scored a 16 and went on to a Hall of Fame career with the <FONT color=#225fb2>Miami Dolphins</FONT> (http://espn.go.com/nfl/team/_/name/mia/miami-dolphins).</P>


http://espn.go.com/nfl/draft2012/story/_/id/7770388/2012-nfl-draft-morris-claiborne-top-cb-prospect-scored-4-wonderlic-sources-say</P>


Claiborne could slip on draft day due to this.</P>


Could he slip into the 20s? Would the Giants be interested?</P>


Marino was known for a strong arm but not for making good decisions with the ball. He and Favre were better known for trying to make an impossible pass and ending up with an interception. Regarding how a player can score 4 on the test and pass classes in colliege he is a star player at LSU. Enough said.</P>


Let me first say that you are a really good poster.</P>


Now let me say that your point about Dan Marino is completely silly.. Dan Marino ran a complex offense and ran it beautifully. He most certainly did NOT have any kind of reputation as a guy who made bad decisions. And the whole "bad decision" rap on any QB has nothing to do with the kinds of decisions made on the Wonderlic test. The "decision" to throw a pass and to whom is a reaction more than a decision. It comes from hours and hours (or years really) of play. Repetition. Its not a thoughful decision at all.</P>


And Bill Polian was on NFL Sirius talking about this kid from LSU. He said that score means NOTHING. It usually comes from a reading problem which has nothing to do with playing football. As evidenced by the fact that the kid is a great football player. He said that 99% of the time it has no effect on the kids play.</P>


He will not drop in the draft.</P>


lol you convinced me that I am wrong. I hate when that happens! Am I at least allowed to stand behind my cheap shot at LSU academics? [:D]</P>


</P>

RedskinHater
04-03-2012, 07:55 PM
#1. If you have 3 Apples and 5 Oranges, how many Apples do you have??

A. 3
B. 5
C. Apples
D. Red

Depends if they are Rome,Gala or Fuji...
If neither, the correct answer is banana.

B&RWarrior
04-03-2012, 08:12 PM
Trent Dilfer just made a great point on NFL 32. He said the Wonderlick is irrelevant b/c there is a difference between the ability to take a standardized test and functional football intelligence. One has nothing to do with the other- that's his argument. I tend to agree in most cases.

Yet I clearly remember MM running the wrong route on several occasions as a Giant and I would blame Gilbride for his complex offense. It wasn't until this year in an interview with Cruz that Eli meets with the wide recievers every week and they go over what routes they are to run if they get certain coverages. MM consistently had problems remembering to run the route he told Eli he would run early on in the week. Like Slipknottin said its proabably lack of work ethic and intelligence.

I say in the end it's about how committed you are. We all learn things at different levels. If you don't have the best memory then you need to practice or study more than the average player. Suzy Kolber said, "The NFL is a league of repetition." - menaing practice it until you get it, no excuses.

BeatYale
04-03-2012, 08:57 PM
Trent Dilfer just made a great point on NFL 32. He said the Wonderlick is irrelevant b/c there is a difference between the ability to take a standardized test and functional football intelligence. One has nothing to do with the other- that's his argument. I tend to agree in most cases.

Well Dilfer is just proving that the point of the test isn't to determine their football knowledge. That doesn't mean the wonderlic is pointless in developing an opinion on the person. College students should be used to standardized testing.

No one will care if a high school drop out scores low on the wonderlic. When a full time college student of up to 4 years scores a 4....it's pathetic. That's the bottom line.

giantman8493
04-03-2012, 09:08 PM
My guess is that he had ADHD and was afriad to take him medicine because it could show up on tests. Ampetamines could be a banned substance.

greenca190
04-03-2012, 10:01 PM
Reporter: "hey Claiborne, how'd you do on the wonderlic?"

Claiborne: "well I cant remember how many i ate but it tasted deeeeee lishis!"

B&RWarrior
04-03-2012, 10:04 PM
Trent Dilfer just made a great point on NFL 32. He said the Wonderlick is irrelevant b/c there is a difference between the ability to take a standardized test and functional football intelligence. One has nothing to do with the other- that's his argument. I tend to agree in most cases.

Well Dilfer is just proving that the point of the test isn't to determine their football knowledge. That doesn't mean the wonderlic is pointless in developing an opinion on the person. College students should be used to standardized testing.

No one will care if a high school drop out scores low on the wonderlic. When a full time college student of up to 4 years scores a 4....it's pathetic. That's the bottom line.

Best line I've heard:
"They're not student-athletes they're athlete-students."

The student part of the equation is becoming more and more of a joke for top Division-1 athletes with the potential to play professional sports.

TuckYou
04-03-2012, 11:21 PM
Whether or not Claiborne succeeds or fails it will be unrelated to his his intelligence level.

Its not a pass or fail thing though.

Look at Manningham, tested very poorly on the wonderlic, while he is a good receiver, the one thing that always pops up with him is that he made mental mistakes. Those mental mistakes are probably what is preventing him from becoming an even better player.

MM was my example of why the Wonderlic isn't a good barometer of a player's ability to succeed in the NFL. MM had a low wonderlic score, yet by every account he's a good WR. He was prone to running the wrong route on plays, but that could have been from a lack of preparation and had nothing
to do with his mental make up.

Yeah, he's a good player, who could be great but won't be. Not to mention he just signed with SF for a 2 yr 7m deal when money is like water in the NFL.