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B&RWarrior
04-25-2012, 09:51 AM
As I've watched Eli over his career he has always been more comfortable in the 2 minute offense. Even in drives right before the end of the first half when the game wasn't on the line heseems to be better when he can establish a rythym in the hurry-up offense. I think Eli has the ability to run an offense like Peyton ran in Indianapolis or like Brees runs in N.O. It won't happen, but if Gilbride were to open the offense all the way I think we could have be an even more potent offense. I think Eli's picks would go way down also.</P>


</P>

manning to shockey
04-25-2012, 09:55 AM
I have agreed with this theory for quite some time now. It doesn't take a genius to see that Eli is a beast when it comes to the 2 minute drill. I would love to see them just let him do his thing. But we just won a super bowl with the current formula so I'm ok with how things are. lol

Morehead State
04-25-2012, 10:04 AM
As I've watched Eli over his career he has always been more comfortable in the 2 minute offense. Even in drives right before the end of the first half when the game wasn't on the line heseems to be better when he can establish a rythym in the hurry-up offense. I think Eli has the ability to run an offense like Peyton ran in Indianapolis or like Brees runs in N.O. It won't happen, but if Gilbride were to open the offense all the way I think we could have be an even more potent offense. I think Eli's picks would go way down also.</P>


</P>


</P>


Part of the consideration for the 2 minute offense is the way defenses play as well. Defenses generally play softer in order to trade yards for seconds. They don't do that in other parts of the game.</P>

Flip Empty
04-25-2012, 10:06 AM
Vacchiano wrote a piece on this last year: http://www.nydailynews.com/blogs/giants/2011/10/no-huddle-no-problem-sometimes-it-is

Gilbride:
Its something that I think can be effective as a change of tempo (in other parts of the game),"

"I dont think its a fantasy and I think you have to be careful. Were trying to help the defense. Were trying to hold onto the ball and slow the game down so that were on the field as much as we can. If youre not careful, that sometimes can backfire.

G-Man67
04-25-2012, 10:15 AM
but if you do it all the time, it won't be as difficultto defendat those most critical times and you could wear out your defence</P>


but i will say, in his own way, Eli is slowly taking more and more responsibility ... i won't pretend to know how it all goes down ... but don't think for a second that Eli is given a set in stone, very specific, run it one way and one way only type play very often ... i bet he gets a general play, reads the D and then calls out a few tweaks</P>


and, of course, he doesn't hesitate to audible completely out of a play depending on his D reads</P>


OMAHA, OMAHA ... man how many more months ... hmmm, 3 for preseason, 5 for regular season</P>

Morehead State
04-25-2012, 10:19 AM
but if you do it all the time, it won't be as difficultto defendat those most critical times and you could wear out your defence</P>


but i will say, in his own way, Eli is slowly taking more and more responsibility ... i won't pretend to know how it all goes down ... but don't think for a second that Eli is given a set in stone, very specific, run it one way and one way only type play very often ... i bet he gets a general play, reads the D and then calls out a few tweaks</P>


and, of course, he doesn't hesitate to audible completely out of a play depending on his D reads</P>


OMAHA, OMAHA ... man how many more months ... hmmm, 3 for preseason, 5 for regular season</P>


</P>


I think OMAHA is a signal that the play clock is winding down.</P>

B&RWarrior
04-25-2012, 10:31 AM
</P>


"but if you do it all the time, it won't be as difficultto defendat those most critical times and you could wear out your defence" </P>


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------</P>


B&amp;R Warrior</P>


Didn't the Colts do it all the time with success. I think Gilbride has had experience with wide-open offenses likewhen he waswith the Houston Oilers. I think he could make it work if he tried.</P>

G-Man67
04-25-2012, 10:37 AM
but if you do it all the time, it won't be as difficultto defendat those most critical times and you could wear out your defence</P>


but i will say, in his own way, Eli is slowly taking more and more responsibility ... i won't pretend to know how it all goes down ... but don't think for a second that Eli is given a set in stone, very specific, run it one way and one way only type play very often ... i bet he gets a general play, reads the D and then calls out a few tweaks</P>


and, of course, he doesn't hesitate to audible completely out of a play depending on his D reads</P>


OMAHA, OMAHA ... man how many more months ... hmmm, 3 for preseason, 5 for regular season</P>


</P>


I think OMAHA is a signal that the play clock is winding down.</P>


</P>


haha, yeah that was revealed this past year</P>


i was just getting myself pumped up [:)]</P>

giantsfan420
04-25-2012, 10:47 AM
i'd run it until we get a lead. then i'd slow it down a lil bit.

and MS, perhaps its the way defenses are playing their defense in the 2 min situations, but I think part of the reason it works so well, is that the d personnel is going to remain the same, and most times the d is going to be in the same coverage bc i dont think the defensive play caller is gonna want to change up the plays in a rush which could easily lead to a break down in the defensive play bc some players didnt hear the new call...

its a myriad of things but i do believe that eli is so successful at it bc he gets to see what the defense is doing and knows it wont change up so he has en even better understanding of the weak spots in the d...

VegasGmen
04-25-2012, 11:00 AM
Vacchiano wrote a piece on this last year: http://www.nydailynews.com/blogs/giants/2011/10/no-huddle-no-problem-sometimes-it-is Gilbride: Its something that I think can be effective as a change of tempo (in other parts of the game)," "I dont think its a fantasy and I think you have to be careful. Were trying to help the defense. Were trying to hold onto the ball and slow the game down so that were on the field as much as we can. If youre not careful, that sometimes can backfire.</P>


Gilbride summed it up pretty well and I agree completely with him. Remember we don't play in a dome or warm weather and our current style is more conducive for the late Nov and Dec games.</P>

ralphpal
04-25-2012, 11:12 AM
well since they won 2 superbowls and could of won a third i have to trust there is a reason why they not running it all the time.
The stats might go up but not the wins.
defenses arent stupid they would adjust no matter what
what happens when the cold weather and wind comes . You just cant turn it on.
On defense would get tired .
it might work better in spurts and would expose our weaknesses

burier
04-25-2012, 11:24 AM
I'd be fine with Eli calling the plays.

But this up tempo stuff is overrated. People act like its some sort of magic bullet that guarantees touchdowns.

We got into during the seattle game and got shut down.

B&RWarrior
04-25-2012, 11:42 AM
I'd be fine with Eli calling the plays. But this up tempo stuff is overrated. People act like its some sort of magic bullet that guarantees touchdowns. We got into during the seattle game and got shut down.</P>


It doesn't look overrated when the Saints are blowing us out.</P>

Morehead State
04-25-2012, 11:44 AM
i'd run it until we get a lead. then i'd slow it down a lil bit. and MS, perhaps its the way defenses are playing their defense in the 2 min situations, but I think part of the reason it works so well, is that the d personnel is going to remain the same, and most times the d is going to be in the same coverage bc i dont think the defensive play caller is gonna want to change up the plays in a rush which could easily lead to a break down in the defensive play bc some players didnt hear the new call... its a myriad of things but i do believe that eli is so successful at it bc he gets to see what the defense is doing and knows it wont change up so he has en even better understanding of the weak spots in the d...</P>


Its true and if we were to run a hurry up like Peyton does, Eli would be a great guy to run it. My point is that just because a 2 minute offense works doesn'tneccessarily mean that it would work as part of the normal offense. there are other factors at play.</P>

chasjay
04-25-2012, 11:44 AM
I agree with those who think it works best as a change-of-pace system - although, I do think it should be used more often during the game as a surprise element, rather than just at the two-minute mark. As good as Peyton has been with it, I believe he might have another ring (or two) if the Colts had a good, standard, grind-it-out offense that they could have shifted to for occasionally slowing down the pace.

G-Man67
04-25-2012, 11:53 AM
I agree with those who think it works best as a change-of-pace system - although, I do think it should be used more often during the game as a surprise element, rather than just at the two-minute mark. As good as Peyton has been with it, I believe he might have another ring (or two) if the Colts had a good, standard, grind-it-out offense that they could have shifted to for occasionally slowing down the pace.
</P>


yeah one thing that i've seen over the years with teams that are all about one unit or the other</P>


let's take indy and dan marino's dolphins</P>


there was the perception that those teams could not run andcould not defend</P>


but, when you look at it ... did the marino dolphins even try to run? .. how many run reps did they do in practice ... did they draft run blocking o-lineman</P>


and did the indy hurry up give the indy D the best chance to be successful all the time?</P>


obviously, the Colts did win a Super Bowl and had some fantastic seasons, so not saying a team can't be so one-sided and cater to one unit above all else, but i do think having more of a "team" approach is better long term</P>


and, of course, we've seen it play out the other way, where the D was the dominant unit and the O was told to not mess it up and be conservative</P>

B&RWarrior
04-25-2012, 11:58 AM
I agree with those who think it works best as a change-of-pace system - although, I do think it should be used more often during the game as a surprise element, rather than just at the two-minute mark. As good as Peyton has been with it, I believe he might have another ring (or two) if the Colts had a good, standard, grind-it-out offense that they could have shifted to for occasionally slowing down the pace.
</P>


They run it in the N.O. but their passing strategy is different, their short and intermediate routes work like an efficient running game, mostly on 3 step drops so it really negates our pass rush. The Colts still worked the deep ball more than the N.O. in their hurry up offense.</P>


The Patshad success incorporating the hurry-up into their offense too. </P>


This is my thinking. The running game is in decline and drafting a RB doesn't fix the problem its the O-line. If we can't reestablish the running attack then we should tweak our offense to fit what we do well. Eli has the skills and Gilbride has the experience of designing an all out passing attack. If the run is there we stick to it, but if not lets bring on the air show baby! </P>

CDN_G-FAN
04-25-2012, 12:08 PM
i hear this stuff about the 2 minute drill all the time.</P>


Eli has alot of freedom at the LOS, and he obviously uses it alot. out of 4 or 5 plays Eli seems to be audibling in half or more than half of them, so its not that different.</P>


The thing i don't like about the 2 minute drill is that it almost always functions on a trimmed down playbook, and you usually trim it down to the plays that the offense performs the best on.</P>


you run the 2 minute more, and you create more film of what's on your trimmed down list, the natural counter to that is to switch up the plays you run in the 2 minute, which means you now start to include plays that either the players don't run as well, or they're less familiar with them.</P>


long story short, our offense has been so goodthat frankly most ideas i read about it seem to be a way to pass the time more than anything that would clearly be an improvement of what we already have.</P>


</P>

chasjay
04-25-2012, 12:08 PM
This is my thinking. The running game is in decline and drafting a RB doesn't fix the problem its the O-line. If we can't reestablish the running attack then we should tweak our offense to fit what we do well. Eli has the skills and Gilbride has the experience of designing an all out passing attack. If the run is there we stick to it, but if not lets bring on the air show baby! </p>

I don't disagree - I just hope we get the running game back in synch this year. Every player, or group, is going to have a game where they are a little off or come out flat - it's good to be able to spread the load around and have someone else to carry the weight when needed. And you are right about the Saints passing game - they eat up a lot of yardage with those quick throws that the backs and receivers break for distance.

CDN_G-FAN
04-25-2012, 12:12 PM
This is my thinking. The running game is in decline and drafting a RB doesn't fix the problem its the O-line. If we can't reestablish the running attack then we should tweak our offense to fit what we do well. Eli has the skills and Gilbride has the experience of designing an all out passing attack. If the run is there we stick to it, but if not lets bring on the air show baby! </P>




I don't disagree - I just hope we get the running game back in synch this year. Every player, or group, is going to have a game where they are a little off or come out flat - it's good to be able to spread the load around and have someone else to carry the weight when needed. And you are right about the Saints passing game - they eat up a lot of yardage with those quick throws that the backs and receivers break for distance.
</P>


there is no way the giants will accept having a mediocre to bad running game.</P>


that's such a slippery slope, having a QB you can lean on is not the same thing as having a QB you HAVE to lean on.</P>

chasjay
04-25-2012, 12:20 PM
This is my thinking. The running game is in decline and drafting a RB doesn't fix the problem its the O-line. If we can't reestablish the running attack then we should tweak our offense to fit what we do well. Eli has the skills and Gilbride has the experience of designing an all out passing attack. If the run is there we stick to it, but if not lets bring on the air show baby! </p>




I don't disagree - I just hope we get the running game back in synch this year. Every player, or group, is going to have a game where they are a little off or come out flat - it's good to be able to spread the load around and have someone else to carry the weight when needed. And you are right about the Saints passing game - they eat up a lot of yardage with those quick throws that the backs and receivers break for distance.
</p>


there is no way the giants will accept having a mediocre to bad running game.</p>


that's such a slippery slope, having a QB you can lean on is not the same thing as having a QB you HAVE to lean on.</p>

Agreed - Coughlin and longtime Giants fans expect to see a legitimate ground game. Not necessarily a lot of long breakaways, but one where 3rd and 1 conversions are standard procedure instead of adventures.

B&RWarrior
04-25-2012, 01:33 PM
This is my thinking. The running game is in decline and drafting a RB doesn't fix the problem its the O-line. If we can't reestablish the running attack then we should tweak our offense to fit what we do well. Eli has the skills and Gilbride has the experience of designing an all out passing attack. If the run is there we stick to it, but if not lets bring on the air show baby! </P>




I don't disagree - I just hope we get the running game back in synch this year. Every player, or group, is going to have a game where they are a little off or come out flat - it's good to be able to spread the load around and have someone else to carry the weight when needed. And you are right about the Saints passing game - they eat up a lot of yardage with those quick throws that the backs and receivers break for distance.
</P>


there is no way the giants will accept having a mediocre to bad running game.</P>


that's such a slippery slope, having a QB you can lean on is not the same thing as having a QB you HAVE to lean on.</P>




Agreed - Coughlin and longtime Giants fans expect to see a legitimate ground game. Not necessarily a lot of long breakaways, but one where 3rd and 1 conversions are standard procedure instead of adventures.
</P>


After the past couple of years I get nervous on 3rd and 1.</P>

burier
04-25-2012, 02:55 PM
I'd be fine with Eli calling the plays. But this up tempo stuff is overrated. People act like its some sort of magic bullet that guarantees touchdowns. We got into during the seattle game and got shut down.</P>


It doesn't look overrated when the Saints are blowing us out.</P>

lol...I'm thinking The Saints blow us out because the players they have on offense are better than the players we have on defense.

BeatYale
04-25-2012, 03:49 PM
During one of his early seasons, can't remember if it was his 2nd or 3rd, we had a knack for scoring on our opening drive via a set of scripted plays. I believe Hufnagel (sp?) was our OC then. I remember Aikman mentioning it during a game.

As for the 2 minute drill, I think most QB's prefer the hurry up offense in those situations because it limits adjustments that the defense can make.

byron
04-25-2012, 05:29 PM
but if you do it all the time, it won't be as difficultto defendat those most critical times and you could wear out your defence</P>


but i will say, in his own way, Eli is slowly taking more and more responsibility ... i won't pretend to know how it all goes down ... but don't think for a second that Eli is given a set in stone, very specific, run it one way and one way only type play very often ... i bet he gets a general play, reads the D and then calls out a few tweaks</P>


and, of course, he doesn't hesitate to audible completely out of a play depending on his D reads</P>


OMAHA, OMAHA ... man how many more months ... hmmm, 3 for preseason, 5 for regular season</P>


</P>


I think OMAHA is a signal that the play clock is winding down.</P>acturaly I think it means snap the ball on the next sound or one......OMAHA,OMAHA.......HUT!

Morehead State
04-25-2012, 06:00 PM
but if you do it all the time, it won't be as difficultto defendat those most critical times and you could wear out your defence</P>


but i will say, in his own way, Eli is slowly taking more and more responsibility ... i won't pretend to know how it all goes down ... but don't think for a second that Eli is given a set in stone, very specific, run it one way and one way only type play very often ... i bet he gets a general play, reads the D and then calls out a few tweaks</P>


and, of course, he doesn't hesitate to audible completely out of a play depending on his D reads</P>


OMAHA, OMAHA ... man how many more months ... hmmm, 3 for preseason, 5 for regular season</P>


</P>


I think OMAHA is a signal that the play clock is winding down.</P>


acturaly I think it means snap the ball on the next sound or one......OMAHA,OMAHA.......HUT!</P>


Don't know what's so special about Omaha. I've been there. And other than some great Steakhouses, its not much at all.</P>


Maybe they can change it to my city of birth.</P>


Cleveland! Cleveland! Set Hut!!</P>


In honor of Good 'Ol Morehead.</P>

byron
04-25-2012, 07:18 PM
but if you do it all the time, it won't be as difficultto defendat those most critical times and you could wear out your defence</P>


but i will say, in his own way, Eli is slowly taking more and more responsibility ... i won't pretend to know how it all goes down ... but don't think for a second that Eli is given a set in stone, very specific, run it one way and one way only type play very often ... i bet he gets a general play, reads the D and then calls out a few tweaks</P>


and, of course, he doesn't hesitate to audible completely out of a play depending on his D reads</P>


OMAHA, OMAHA ... man how many more months ... hmmm, 3 for preseason, 5 for regular season</P>


</P>


I think OMAHA is a signal that the play clock is winding down.</P>


acturaly I think it means snap the ball on the next sound or one......OMAHA,OMAHA.......HUT!</P>


Don't know what's so special about Omaha. I've been there. And other than some great Steakhouses, its not much at all.</P>


Maybe they can change it to my city of birth.</P>


Cleveland! Cleveland! Set Hut!!</P>


In honor of Good 'Ol Morehead.</P> you should send a note off to the C Staffsounds like a winner

Drez
04-25-2012, 09:28 PM
I'd be fine with Eli calling the plays. But this up tempo stuff is overrated. People act like its some sort of magic bullet that guarantees touchdowns. We got into during the seattle game and got shut down.</p>


It doesn't look overrated when the Saints are blowing us out.</p>
Only in the Dome. And with the Saints it isn't even that they take so little time in between plays, but the plays they call are usually very quick and don't allow for our pass rush to be effective.

CDN_G-FAN
04-25-2012, 09:31 PM
This is my thinking.* The running game is in decline and drafting a RB doesn't fix the problem its the O-line.* If we can't reestablish the running attack then we should tweak our offense to fit what we do well.* Eli has the skills and Gilbride has the experience of designing an all out passing attack.* If the run is there we stick to it, but if not lets bring on the air show baby!* </P>




I don't disagree - I just hope we get the running game back in synch this year. Every player, or group, is going to have a game where they are a little off or come out flat - it's good to be able to spread the load around and have someone else to carry the weight when needed. And you are right about the Saints passing game - they eat up a lot of yardage with those quick throws that the backs and receivers break for distance.
</P>


there is no way the giants will accept having a mediocre to bad running game.</P>


that's such a slippery slope, having a QB you can lean on is not the same thing as having a QB you HAVE to lean on.</P>




Agreed - Coughlin and longtime Giants fans expect to see a legitimate ground game. Not necessarily a lot of long breakaways, but one where 3rd and 1 conversions are standard procedure instead of adventures.
</P>


After the past couple of years I get nervous on 3rd and 1.</P>

when you have a 265 lbs RB that runs like he's 185 lbs, that'll happen......

Drez
04-25-2012, 09:31 PM
During one of his early seasons, can't remember if it was his 2nd or 3rd, we had a knack for scoring on our opening drive via a set of scripted plays. I believe Hufnagel (sp?) was our OC then. I remember Aikman mentioning it during a game.

As for the 2 minute drill, I think most QB's prefer the hurry up offense in those situations because it limits adjustments that the defense can make. Most OC's script the first bunch of plays, usually the first series or two.

Drez
04-25-2012, 09:32 PM
This is my thinking. The running game is in decline and drafting a RB doesn't fix the problem its the O-line. If we can't reestablish the running attack then we should tweak our offense to fit what we do well. Eli has the skills and Gilbride has the experience of designing an all out passing attack. If the run is there we stick to it, but if not lets bring on the air show baby! </p>




I don't disagree - I just hope we get the running game back in synch this year. Every player, or group, is going to have a game where they are a little off or come out flat - it's good to be able to spread the load around and have someone else to carry the weight when needed. And you are right about the Saints passing game - they eat up a lot of yardage with those quick throws that the backs and receivers break for distance.
</p>


there is no way the giants will accept having a mediocre to bad running game.</p>


that's such a slippery slope, having a QB you can lean on is not the same thing as having a QB you HAVE to lean on.</p>




Agreed - Coughlin and longtime Giants fans expect to see a legitimate ground game. Not necessarily a lot of long breakaways, but one where 3rd and 1 conversions are standard procedure instead of adventures.
</p>


After the past couple of years I get nervous on 3rd and 1.</p>

when you have a 265 lbs RB that runs like he's 185 lbs, that'll happen......
More importantly when you have 5-325 lbs OL that block like they're 185 lbs, that'll happen.

Toadofsteel
04-26-2012, 12:54 PM
Here's another thing though... Eli knows how to run the 2 minute drill, but he also knows how to run the 10 minute drill. In both opening drives in each of the super bowls, the Giants got the ball first (won the coin toss in 2007, NE deferred in 2011). In each case, the opening drive went on FOREVER. Eli can munch on clock time against really good opposing offenses.

G-Man67
04-26-2012, 01:38 PM
Here's another thing though... Eli knows how to run the 2 minute drill, but he also knows how to run the 10 minute drill. In both opening drives in each of the super bowls, the Giants got the ball first (won the coin toss in 2007, NE deferred in 2011). In each case, the opening drive went on FOREVER. Eli can munch on clock time against really good opposing offenses.</P>


good point and that can deflate a team ... they come out of the locker room all fired up and next thing you know their offense is watching AB drag some big uns' for a few extra yards while the clock ticks</P>

NYtoSanDiego
04-26-2012, 05:40 PM
As I've watched Eli over his career he has always been more comfortable in the 2 minute offense.* Even in drives right before the end of the first half when the game wasn't on the line he*seems to be better when he can establish a rythym in the hurry-up offense.* I think Eli has the ability to run an offense like Peyton ran in Indianapolis or like Brees runs in N.O.** It won't happen, but if Gilbride were to open the offense all the way I think we could have be an even more potent offense.* I think Eli's picks would go way down also.</P>


*</P>

i've always said the giants pass offense is geared for a hurry up offense and probably more so than peyton was in indy. why? the giants pass offense runs option reads for all of its receivers so eli wouldn't have to do what peyton does which is not really a hurry up but what insiders refer to as a muddle huddle.

Muddle Huddle:
In a muddle huddle, players line up close to the line of scrimmage and the quarterback makes a quick call of the basic play. The quarterback reads the defensive formation and then calls out adjustments to the play call based on what he sees.

Streak and Read Principle Offense: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_England_Patriots_strategy

teams who run option reads like the giants, patriots and saints can run a true no huddle offense. i don't think coughlin would want to and would rather have it when its needed but who knows maybe 2012 will be different.

TrueBlue@NYC
04-26-2012, 06:36 PM
As I've watched Eli over his career he has always been more comfortable in the 2 minute offense. Even in drives right before the end of the first half when the game wasn't on the line heseems to be better when he can establish a rythym in the hurry-up offense. I think Eli has the ability to run an offense like Peyton ran in Indianapolis or like Brees runs in N.O. It won't happen, but if Gilbride were to open the offense all the way I think we could have be an even more potent offense. I think Eli's picks would go way down also.</P>


</P>


Breese doesn't run the no huddle in NO and the hurry up offense, which is run usually in the end of the game/half and consists of maybe a hand full of plays is different than a no huddle offense which is run all game with the entire playbook (the play is called at the line). </P>

B&RWarrior
04-26-2012, 06:56 PM
As I've watched Eli over his career he has always been more comfortable in the 2 minute offense. Even in drives right before the end of the first half when the game wasn't on the line heseems to be better when he can establish a rythym in the hurry-up offense. I think Eli has the ability to run an offense like Peyton ran in Indianapolis or like Brees runs in N.O. It won't happen, but if Gilbride were to open the offense all the way I think we could have be an even more potent offense. I think Eli's picks would go way down also.</P>


</P>


Breese doesn't run the no huddle in NO and the hurry up offense, which is run usually in the end of the game/half and consists of maybe a hand full of plays is different than a no huddle offense which is run all game with the entire playbook (the play is called at the line). </P>


</P>


Saints run an uptempo offense and not necessarily at the end of halfs or the end of games. They take less time than most teams getting back to the line and calling plays. I don't know exatly how often they use it but its' often. </P>

chasjay
04-26-2012, 07:00 PM
As I've watched Eli over his career he has always been more comfortable in the 2 minute offense. Even in drives right before the end of the first half when the game wasn't on the line heseems to be better when he can establish a rythym in the hurry-up offense. I think Eli has the ability to run an offense like Peyton ran in Indianapolis or like Brees runs in N.O. It won't happen, but if Gilbride were to open the offense all the way I think we could have be an even more potent offense. I think Eli's picks would go way down also.</p>


</p>


Breese doesn't run the no huddle in NO and the hurry up offense, which is run usually in the end of the game/half and consists of maybe a hand full of plays is different than a no huddle offense which is run all game with the entire playbook (the play is called at the line). </p>


</p>


Saints run an uptempo offense and not necessarily at the end of halfs or the end of games. They take less time than most teams getting back to the line and calling plays. I don't know exatly how often they use it but its' often. </p>

It seems to me that they go to it when they sense confusion, or a lack of confidence, in the opposing defense.