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THE_New_York_Giants
05-29-2012, 02:58 AM
Okay I've live in Belfast for about half of the year every year up until this year. Cricket confuses the hell out of me and nobody seems to be able to explain it to me. Anyone care to help me understand the game a little bit better? Wikipedia doesn't help me. Maybe it's the terminology or something. I have just never understood what the hell is going on there.

sunsgiants
05-29-2012, 04:37 AM
Cricket is actually a very fun sport. For obvious reasons, we can look to baseball as a parallel. The goal of the game is to have more runs than the other team by the end of the game.

In cricket there are 11 starters on a team, whereas, in baseball I think there are 9 starters.

Let's look at the field now. Cricket and baseball are similar here in terms of the various sizes of their fields. But the shapes are very different. In baseball, pitcher pitches the ball about 60 feet from a mound to a batter who stands on the vertex of a diamond. Basically, a baseball play starts at one edge of the field. In cricket, however, the bowler (basically a pitcher) bowls on a long rectangular strip of dirt that is about 22 yards and is smack dab in the middle of the field. The field itself is a circular/oval shape.

Now how the play is recorded. A baseball match ends with 9 innings (provided there's no extra innings due to a tie) with the victor being the team with more runs at the end of the 9 innings. In cricket it is much different. One pitch is equivalent to one ball in cricketing terms. The act of throwing the ball is called bowling the ball. So bowling the ball 6 times is called one over. Now here it gets iffy. Unlike baseball, cricket can be played in 3 different formats. The first being called a Test match. In a test match, the game is played over a maximum range of 5 days. One team begins batting first and obviously one begins bowling. The object for the batting team would be to score as many runs as possible without losing all their batters or in cricketing terms, batsmen. Now if the opposing team cannot get all of the batsmen out than the batting team can keep scoring until they feel they are at a distinct advantage, at which point they will declare their innings over. At that point they will be X number of runs in the lead. Then the sides are switched, bowling team becomes batting and vice versa. The team that is batting now will try to overcome the run total of the previous batting team or atleast come very close to it. If the team that batted second overcomes the X total of runs then they will be in the lead by difference of their accumulated runs and the X number of runs scored by the previous batting team. If they underscore than the difference will show how much they are behind. So once each side has atleast one chance to bat , then the team who started the match batting will be batting again and this will be their second and final innings. The point is same as before. They either extend their lead if the other team was not able to overcome or they overtake the lead if the lead was surpassed. Basically this is what might've happened so far:
Team A: scored 200 runs in its first innings
Team B: scored 150 runs in its first innings
so after the first innings of both teams, Team A is in the lead by 50 runs.
Team A: scored 100 runs in its second innings.
So now add 100 runs to the lead which was 50 runs. So the total lead or target is 150 runs. Team B must now score 151 runs in order to win the match.
This occurs over 5 days. The play of each day is simply dictated by the sunlight available and the weather. Basically if it gets too dark than the umpires decide that its too dark to play.

Now that was very confusing, I must admit. A more simpler format of the game is called an ODI; initials for One Day International. The match must be essentially completed within one day. Remember how I said six balls = 1 over. This is how ODI's are restricted. Each team is allotted one innings which is 50 overs long, so basically 300 balls to score as much as possible without losing all their batsmen. The team who bats second basically tries to surpass the total set by the team who batted first in the allotted 50 overs.
Team A scored 200 runs in 50 overs
Team B scored 201 runs in 49.4 overs meaning Team B won. They were able to surpass Team A's total with 2 balls to spare. Remember, six balls = 1 over = 1.0; so 49.4 basically means 49 overs and 4 balls have been passed or bowled. Since six balls = 1 over then 2 balls left in the match. 49.6 = 50

A new format that has been introduced in the last decade is called the T20. It stands for twenty-twenty. Same things as an ODI except in 20 overs. This is done to produce a fast paced game where batting prowess dominates a bowling strengths. This format is more popular with the public as it a high paced and highlight driven format.

Now for the game itself. The big difference between baseball and cricket is scoring. To baseball fans, the amounts scored in a cricket match may seem ridiculous and astronomic; to a cricket fan the amount scored in a baseball game may seem pathetic and paltry. But the score is just a result due to the style of play.

Well there's a lot more information and this is incomplete. But it is late here and I must go. If you understood the above information so far then I will continue the explanation. Hope this helps!

GMENAGAIN
05-29-2012, 09:42 AM
I always thought that it was just gay baseball . . . . .

THE_New_York_Giants
05-29-2012, 12:46 PM
I always thought that it was just gay baseball . . . . .
lmfao! Great laugh

THE_New_York_Giants
05-29-2012, 12:50 PM
Cricket is actually a very fun sport. For obvious reasons, we can look to baseball as a parallel. The goal of the game is to have more runs than the other team by the end of the game.

In cricket there are 11 starters on a team, whereas, in baseball I think there are 9 starters.

Let's look at the field now. Cricket and baseball are similar here in terms of the various sizes of their fields. But the shapes are very different. In baseball, pitcher pitches the ball about 60 feet from a mound to a batter who stands on the vertex of a diamond. Basically, a baseball play starts at one edge of the field. In cricket, however, the bowler (basically a pitcher) bowls on a long rectangular strip of dirt that is about 22 yards and is smack dab in the middle of the field. The field itself is a circular/oval shape.

Now how the play is recorded. A baseball match ends with 9 innings (provided there's no extra innings due to a tie) with the victor being the team with more runs at the end of the 9 innings. In cricket it is much different. One pitch is equivalent to one ball in cricketing terms. The act of throwing the ball is called bowling the ball. So bowling the ball 6 times is called one over. Now here it gets iffy. Unlike baseball, cricket can be played in 3 different formats. The first being called a Test match. In a test match, the game is played over a maximum range of 5 days. One team begins batting first and obviously one begins bowling. The object for the batting team would be to score as many runs as possible without losing all their batters or in cricketing terms, batsmen. Now if the opposing team cannot get all of the batsmen out than the batting team can keep scoring until they feel they are at a distinct advantage, at which point they will declare their innings over. At that point they will be X number of runs in the lead. Then the sides are switched, bowling team becomes batting and vice versa. The team that is batting now will try to overcome the run total of the previous batting team or atleast come very close to it. If the team that batted second overcomes the X total of runs then they will be in the lead by difference of their accumulated runs and the X number of runs scored by the previous batting team. If they underscore than the difference will show how much they are behind. So once each side has atleast one chance to bat , then the team who started the match batting will be batting again and this will be their second and final innings. The point is same as before. They either extend their lead if the other team was not able to overcome or they overtake the lead if the lead was surpassed. Basically this is what might've happened so far:
Team A: scored 200 runs in its first innings
Team B: scored 150 runs in its first innings
so after the first innings of both teams, Team A is in the lead by 50 runs.
Team A: scored 100 runs in its second innings.
So now add 100 runs to the lead which was 50 runs. So the total lead or target is 150 runs. Team B must now score 151 runs in order to win the match.
This occurs over 5 days. The play of each day is simply dictated by the sunlight available and the weather. Basically if it gets too dark than the umpires decide that its too dark to play.

Now that was very confusing, I must admit. A more simpler format of the game is called an ODI; initials for One Day International. The match must be essentially completed within one day. Remember how I said six balls = 1 over. This is how ODI's are restricted. Each team is allotted one innings which is 50 overs long, so basically 300 balls to score as much as possible without losing all their batsmen. The team who bats second basically tries to surpass the total set by the team who batted first in the allotted 50 overs.
Team A scored 200 runs in 50 overs
Team B scored 201 runs in 49.4 overs meaning Team B won. They were able to surpass Team A's total with 2 balls to spare. Remember, six balls = 1 over = 1.0; so 49.4 basically means 49 overs and 4 balls have been passed or bowled. Since six balls = 1 over then 2 balls left in the match. 49.6 = 50

A new format that has been introduced in the last decade is called the T20. It stands for twenty-twenty. Same things as an ODI except in 20 overs. This is done to produce a fast paced game where batting prowess dominates a bowling strengths. This format is more popular with the public as it a high paced and highlight driven format.

Now for the game itself. The big difference between baseball and cricket is scoring. To baseball fans, the amounts scored in a cricket match may seem ridiculous and astronomic; to a cricket fan the amount scored in a baseball game may seem pathetic and paltry. But the score is just a result due to the style of play.

Well there's a lot more information and this is incomplete. But it is late here and I must go. If you understood the above information so far then I will continue the explanation. Hope this helps!
This actually helped a lot. Thanks!! Maybe I'll actually go see a match now and try to keep up haha.

THE_New_York_Giants
05-29-2012, 12:51 PM
Cricket is actually a very fun sport. For obvious reasons, we can look to baseball as a parallel. The goal of the game is to have more runs than the other team by the end of the game.

In cricket there are 11 starters on a team, whereas, in baseball I think there are 9 starters.

Let's look at the field now. Cricket and baseball are similar here in terms of the various sizes of their fields. But the shapes are very different. In baseball, pitcher pitches the ball about 60 feet from a mound to a batter who stands on the vertex of a diamond. Basically, a baseball play starts at one edge of the field. In cricket, however, the bowler (basically a pitcher) bowls on a long rectangular strip of dirt that is about 22 yards and is smack dab in the middle of the field. The field itself is a circular/oval shape.

Now how the play is recorded. A baseball match ends with 9 innings (provided there's no extra innings due to a tie) with the victor being the team with more runs at the end of the 9 innings. In cricket it is much different. One pitch is equivalent to one ball in cricketing terms. The act of throwing the ball is called bowling the ball. So bowling the ball 6 times is called one over. Now here it gets iffy. Unlike baseball, cricket can be played in 3 different formats. The first being called a Test match. In a test match, the game is played over a maximum range of 5 days. One team begins batting first and obviously one begins bowling. The object for the batting team would be to score as many runs as possible without losing all their batters or in cricketing terms, batsmen. Now if the opposing team cannot get all of the batsmen out than the batting team can keep scoring until they feel they are at a distinct advantage, at which point they will declare their innings over. At that point they will be X number of runs in the lead. Then the sides are switched, bowling team becomes batting and vice versa. The team that is batting now will try to overcome the run total of the previous batting team or atleast come very close to it. If the team that batted second overcomes the X total of runs then they will be in the lead by difference of their accumulated runs and the X number of runs scored by the previous batting team. If they underscore than the difference will show how much they are behind. So once each side has atleast one chance to bat , then the team who started the match batting will be batting again and this will be their second and final innings. The point is same as before. They either extend their lead if the other team was not able to overcome or they overtake the lead if the lead was surpassed. Basically this is what might've happened so far:
Team A: scored 200 runs in its first innings
Team B: scored 150 runs in its first innings
so after the first innings of both teams, Team A is in the lead by 50 runs.
Team A: scored 100 runs in its second innings.
So now add 100 runs to the lead which was 50 runs. So the total lead or target is 150 runs. Team B must now score 151 runs in order to win the match.
This occurs over 5 days. The play of each day is simply dictated by the sunlight available and the weather. Basically if it gets too dark than the umpires decide that its too dark to play.

Now that was very confusing, I must admit. A more simpler format of the game is called an ODI; initials for One Day International. The match must be essentially completed within one day. Remember how I said six balls = 1 over. This is how ODI's are restricted. Each team is allotted one innings which is 50 overs long, so basically 300 balls to score as much as possible without losing all their batsmen. The team who bats second basically tries to surpass the total set by the team who batted first in the allotted 50 overs.
Team A scored 200 runs in 50 overs
Team B scored 201 runs in 49.4 overs meaning Team B won. They were able to surpass Team A's total with 2 balls to spare. Remember, six balls = 1 over = 1.0; so 49.4 basically means 49 overs and 4 balls have been passed or bowled. Since six balls = 1 over then 2 balls left in the match. 49.6 = 50

A new format that has been introduced in the last decade is called the T20. It stands for twenty-twenty. Same things as an ODI except in 20 overs. This is done to produce a fast paced game where batting prowess dominates a bowling strengths. This format is more popular with the public as it a high paced and highlight driven format.

Now for the game itself. The big difference between baseball and cricket is scoring. To baseball fans, the amounts scored in a cricket match may seem ridiculous and astronomic; to a cricket fan the amount scored in a baseball game may seem pathetic and paltry. But the score is just a result due to the style of play.

Well there's a lot more information and this is incomplete. But it is late here and I must go. If you understood the above information so far then I will continue the explanation. Hope this helps!
This actually helped a lot. Thanks!! Maybe I'll actually go see a match now and try to keep up haha.

sunsgiants
05-29-2012, 11:37 PM
Well since you're in Belfast maybe you've heard about Kevin O'Brien. He made quite an impact in the previous World Cup.