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THEE NYG SWAG THREAD

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  • LOL. I have never had mead and the bar I work at doesn't offer it, well it might now I have been away so long. So I will take your word for how good it is.

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    • Originally posted by jmike View Post
      LOL. I have never had mead and the bar I work at doesn't offer it, well it might now I have been away so long. So I will take your word for how good it is.
      I've never seen it at a bar. Kind of a niche.
      You can get it at big liquor stores, and nicer beer outlets, etc.
      Oderint Dum Metuant

      It's too bad, I'm too good....

      Comment


        • Acerglyn: A mead made with honey and maple syrup.
        • Balche: A native Mexican version of mead.
        • Bilbemel: A mead made with blueberries, blueberry juice, or sometimes used for a varietal mead that uses blueberry blossom honey.
        • Black mead: A name sometimes given to the blend of honey and blackcurrants.
        • Blue mead: A type of mead where fungal spores are added during first fermentation, lending a blue tint to the final product.
        • Bochet: A mead where the honey is caramelized or burned separately before adding the water. Yields toffee, caramel, chocolate and toasted marshmallow flavors.
        • Bochetomel: A Bochet style mead that also contains fruit such as elderberries, black raspberries and blackberries.
        • Braggot: Also called bracket or brackett. Originally brewed with honey and hops, later with honey and malt—with or without hops added. Welsh origin (bragawd).
        • Capsicumel: A mead flavored with chilli peppers, the peppers may be hot or mild.
        • Chouchenn: A kind of mead made in Brittany.
        • Cyser: A blend of honey and apple juice fermented together; see also cider.
        • Czwórniak (TSG): A Polish mead, made using three units of water for each unit of honey.
        • Dandaghare: A mead from Nepal, combines honey with Himalayan herbs and spices. It has been produced since 1972 in the city of Pokhara.
        • Dwójniak (TSG): A Polish mead, made using equal amounts of water and honey.
        • Great mead: Any mead that is intended to be aged several years. The designation is meant to distinguish this type of mead from "short mead" (see below).
        • Gverc or Medovina: Croatian mead prepared in Samobor and many other places. The word "gverc" or "gvirc' is from the German "Gewürze" and refers to various spices added to mead.
        • Hydromel: Name derived from the Greek ὑδρόμελι hydromeli, i.e. literally "water-honey" (see also μελίκρατον melikraton and ὑδρόμηλον hydromelon). It is also the Frenchname for mead hydromel. (See also and compare with the Catalan hidromel and aiguamel, Galician aiguamel, Portuguese hidromel, Italian idromele and Spanish hidromieland aguamiel). It is also used as a name for a light or low-alcohol mead.
        • Medica/Medovica: Slovenian, Slovakian, variety of mead.
        • Medovina: Czech, Croatian, Serbian, Montenegrin, Bulgarian, Bosnian and Slovak for mead. Commercially available in the Czech Republic, Slovakia and presumably other Central and Eastern-European countries.
        • Medovukha: Eastern Slavic variant (honey-based fermented drink).[43]
        • Melomel: Melomel is made from honey and any fruit. Depending on the fruit base used, certain melomels may also be known by more specific names (see cyser, pyment, and morat for examples). Possibly from the Greek μηλόμελι melomeli, literally "apple-honey" or "treefruit-honey" (see also μελίμηλον melimelon).
        • Metheglin: Metheglin is traditional mead with herbs or spices added. Some of the most common metheglins are ginger, tea, orange peel, nutmeg, coriander, cinnamon, cloves or vanilla. Its name indicates that many metheglins were originally employed as folk medicines. The Welsh word for mead is medd, and the word "metheglin" derives from meddyglyn, a compound of meddyg, "healing" + llyn, "liquor".
        • Midus: Lithuanian for mead, made of natural bee honey and berry juice. Infused with carnation blossoms, acorns, poplar buds, juniper berries and other herbs, it is often made as a mead distillate or mead nectar, some of the varieties having as much as 75% of alcohol.[citation needed]
        • Mődu: An Estonian traditional fermented drink with a taste of honey and an alcohol content of 4.0% [44]
        • Morat: Morat blends honey and mulberries.
        • Mulsum: Mulsum is not a true mead, but is unfermented honey blended with a high-alcohol wine.
        • Myod: Traditional Russian mead, historically available in three major varieties:
          • aged mead ("мёд ставленный"): a mixture of honey and water or berry juices, subject to a very slow (12–50 years) anaerobic fermentation in airtight vessels in a process similar to the traditional balsamic vinegar, creating a rich, complex and high-priced product.
          • drinking mead ("мёд питный"): a kind of honey wine made from diluted honey by traditional fermentation.
          • boiled mead ("мёд варёный"): a drink closer to beer, brewed from boiled wort of diluted honey and herbs, very similar to modern medovukha.
        • Omphacomel: A mead recipe that blends honey with verjuice; could therefore be considered a variety of pyment (q.v.). From the Greek ὀμφακόμελι omphakomeli, literally "unripe-grape-honey".
        • Oxymel: Another historical mead recipe, blending honey with wine vinegar. From the Greek ὀξύμελι oxymeli, literally "vinegar-honey" (also ὀξυμελίκρατον oxymelikraton).
        • Pitarrilla: Mayan drink made from a fermented mixture of wild honey, balché-tree bark and fresh water.[45]
        • Pyment: Contemporary pyment is a melomel made from the fermentation of a blend of grapes and honey and can be considered either a grape mead or honeyed wine.[46][47]Pyment made with white grapes is sometimes called "white mead".[citation needed] In previous centuries piment was synonymous with Hippocras, a grape wine with honey added post-fermentation.[48]
        • Półtorak (TSG): A Polish great mead, made using two units of honey for each unit of water.
        • Red mead: A form of mead made with redcurrants.
        • Rhodomel: Rhodomel is made from honey, rose hips, rose petals or rose attar, and water. From the Greek ῥοδόμελι rhodomeli, literally "rose-honey".
        • Rubamel: A specific type of Melomel made with raspberries.
        • Sack mead: This refers to mead that is made with more honey than is typically used. The finished product contains a higher-than-average ethanol concentration (meads at or above 14% ABV are generally considered to be of sack strength) and often retains a high specific gravity and elevated levels of sweetness, although dry sack meads (which have no residual sweetness) can be produced. According to one theory, the name derives from the fortified dessert wine, sherry (which is sometimes sweetened after fermentation) that, in England, once bore the nickname "sack").[49] Another theory is that the term is a phonetic reduction of "sake" the name of a Japanese beverage that was introduced to the West by Spanish and Portuguese traders.[50]
        • Short mead: Also called "quick mead". A type of mead recipe that is meant to age quickly, for immediate consumption. Because of the techniques used in its creation, short mead shares some qualities found in cider (or even light ale): primarily that it is effervescent, and often has a cidery taste.[citation needed] It can also be champagne-like.
        • Show mead: A term which has come to mean "plain" mead: that which has honey and water as a base, with no fruits, spices or extra flavorings. Since honey alone often does not provide enough nourishment for the yeast to carry on its life cycle, a mead that is devoid of fruit, etc. will sometimes require a special yeast nutrient and other enzymes to produce an acceptable finished product. In most competitions, including all those that subscribe to the BJCP style guidelines, as well as the International Mead Fest, the term "traditional mead" refers to this variety (because mead is historically a variable product, these guidelines are a recent expedient, designed to provide a common language for competition judging; style guidelines per se do not apply to commercial or historical examples of this or any other type of mead).[citation needed]
        • Sima: a quick-fermented low-alcoholic Finnish variety, seasoned with lemon and associated with the festival of vappu.
        • Tej/Mes: Tej/Mes is an Ethiopian and Eritrean mead, fermented with wild yeasts and the addition of gesho.
        • Tella/Suwa: Tella is an Ethiopian and Eritrean style of beer; with the inclusion of honey some recipes are similar to braggot.
        • Trójniak (TSG): A Polish mead, made using two units of water for each unit of honey.
        • White mead: A mead that is colored white with herbs, fruit or, sometimes, egg whites.

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        • "Sir, I was wondering: did you happen to catch the professional football contest on television last night?"
          "No...I didn't."
          "Oh it was most exhilarating: the Giants of NY took on the Packers of Green Bay and in the end the Giants triumphed by kicking an oblong ball made of pigskin through a big H. It was a most ripping victory."

          Comment


          • Who knew?
            Mead just ain't plain old mead anymore. Geez, you could almost have a full semester course just on making mead.
            Who knew?
            Last night, for the first time in my life, I found myself rooting for the Eagles to beat Carolina. If we're not going to win our division I'm hoping the Eagles beat out Dallas and Washington.

            Comment


            • Bunch of Viking wannabes.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by zimonami View Post
                Who knew?
                Mead just ain't plain old mead anymore. Geez, you could almost have a full semester course just on making mead.
                Who knew?
                Last night, for the first time in my life, I found myself rooting for the Eagles to beat Carolina. If we're not going to win our division I'm hoping the Eagles beat out Dallas and Washington.
                I disagree. At this point I will come away satisfied with the season if they go 2-12 and the only wins are against the Eagles.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by JoeBigBlue View Post
                  Reminds me of high school!!
                  actually this was more my style:
                  Oderint Dum Metuant

                  It's too bad, I'm too good....

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by zimonami View Post
                    Who knew?
                    Mead just ain't plain old mead anymore. Geez, you could almost have a full semester course just on making mead.
                    Who knew?
                    Last night, for the first time in my life, I found myself rooting for the Eagles to beat Carolina. If we're not going to win our division I'm hoping the Eagles beat out Dallas and Washington.
                    no ****ing way, man.....
                    I'll never accept anything short of Philly and Dallas losing all the time.

                    If the Skins win the division, so be it, I don't care about the Skins. But the iggles and cowpies? no ****ing way. Woe to those who oppose!!!!!!!
                    Oderint Dum Metuant

                    It's too bad, I'm too good....

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by JPizzack View Post

                      no ****ing way, man.....
                      I'll never accept anything short of Philly and Dallas losing all the time.

                      If the Skins win the division, so be it, I don't care about the Skins. But the iggles and cowpies? no ****ing way. Woe to those who oppose!!!!!!!
                      I oppose. Eagles are behind both. I would rather see Dallas lift the next 12 Lombardis than watch the Eagles hold even one.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by jmike View Post

                        I oppose. Eagles are behind both. I would rather see Dallas lift the next 12 Lombardis than watch the Eagles hold even one.
                        No...neither are options.
                        Oderint Dum Metuant

                        It's too bad, I'm too good....

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by JPizzack View Post

                          Reminds me of high school!!
                          actually this was more my style:
                          hahaha yuup. Ol goold.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by dezzzR View Post

                            hahaha yuup. Ol goold.
                            yea man....at the bodega down to block from me, it was the cheapest option. I think they were $1 a bottle, so we'd pool the money together for like a whopping $10 and load up for the night lol
                            Oderint Dum Metuant

                            It's too bad, I'm too good....

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by JPizzack View Post

                              No...neither are options.
                              You are incorrect sir. If the scale of like and dislike was the solar system the Giants would be the sun, Dallas would be pluto and the Eagles would be ULAS J0744.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by dezzzR View Post

                                Yea you don't want to deal with that ****. Have you thought about selling it and getting another one? Get something cheap if you're just using it to plow.
                                yeah I can't do that this year .. I have to f 150 pickups both getting old " long story how that happen " I've learned over time isn't the way to go sitting around hurts them in all kinds of ways including mice so if and when I buy again it will be a pickup with plow that I use everyday

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