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  • #16
    Originally posted by Morehead State View Post
    Actually...what you are suggesting is illegal. Its called collusion. The MLB owners were harshly punished for that in the courts years ago.
    The players get their % of the total revenues. That's the negotiated deal. That's the CBA.
    The owners don't set the cap number. The cap number is dictated by total NFL revenues.
    Yeah, that'd totally be collusion. It's illegal even outside of football, too.

    And the how the Total Revenue is dictated by an agreement between both the players and the owners.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Rat_bastich View Post
      I think the other term that bothers me more than this phrase is the "I'm just trying to feed my family" phrase. What the hell is your family eating...lobster, steak and $900 bottles of wine every day?

      I make a very small percent of what a minimum pay NFLer makes and I feed my family just fine.
      .
      The reality of your life and that of an athlete are very different. Do you have hangers-on asking you for money all the time, including family like parents or siblings? Do you only get paid 17 weeks a year? Is the maximum earning potential of your career just a scant 4 or 5 years? Does the culture of your profession encourage frivolous spending?

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Drez View Post
        The reality of your life and that of an athlete are very different. Do you have hangers-on asking you for money all the time, including family like parents or siblings? Do you only get paid 17 weeks a year? Is the maximum earning potential of your career just a scant 4 or 5 years? Does the culture of your profession encourage frivolous spending?
        The other factor is that in the NFL, they can end a contract at any time and all you get is the guaranteed money.
        If you get hurt it doesn't matter how many years are left on your deal. Your toast.
        Admit nothing. Deny everything. Make counter accusations.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by GreenZone View Post
          Just read for the umpteenth time the "let's face it, it's a business" mantra.

          When a player gets cut, you sometimes get: "It's a business. They really don't care about me."

          When the player plays on a Superbowl winner and has the opportunity to play elsewhere for more money, they're often bolting:, "Hey, it's a business. I have to make a decision for my family while I'm in the prime of my career" they might be heard to say.

          When management (a G.M.) decides to let a player who has been a great player for the franchise, particularly in New York, where revenues are large, it's due to a lot of players on the team already being paid a lot of money for what they do. There being a finite limit on dollars to pay everyone, as agreed to by everyone, management and players alike.

          No one is being "cheap" here, at least in the case of when a team is spending up to the salary cap.

          The tag line that often goes with the it's a business line is: "Where's the loyalty?"

          How many players are loyal to their teammates enough to give up some of the limited pie to satisfy their teammates desire to "feed their family"?

          How many players are loyal enough to those who made the game a success before them and are suffering greatly today to give up part of that pie to help them?

          If Victor Cruz were to actually get paid $10 million next year, you can guarantee that pie will be short around the table for a number of teammates, and more of them will actually have to be let go.

          Players' agents are the ones, along with the players themselves, that you'll sometimes hear publicly pleading their cause. Rarely, it ever, does management have the same opportunity to pull on emotions (a.k.a. attempted manipulation to gain bargaining leverage for the agent and/or the player's own increase in sheckels.

          This is a business that wouldn't exist were it not for the owners who built it. And the pie is rather large for everyone to share. Players agree to the system, and the only ones being "cheated" in any negotiation is the fellow athletes whose pie are collectively being slivered away from them.

          Few ever speak on behalf of the owner or what they've created for all of us to enjoy and the athlete to potentially prosper.

          So, yes, that's the business. For the NFL player, it's gaining money in a competitive scenario in an effort to squeeze it away from other fellow players, and doing so without really thinking in those terms.
          Do you take the same approach with your own personal employment? Do you make sure that you are not taking too much of your company's "pie" so that your fellow employees can get their share too?

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          • #20
            Originally posted by GreenZone View Post
            Just read for the umpteenth time the "let's face it, it's a business" mantra.

            When a player gets cut, you sometimes get: "It's a business. They really don't care about me."

            When the player plays on a Superbowl winner and has the opportunity to play elsewhere for more money, they're often bolting:, "Hey, it's a business. I have to make a decision for my family while I'm in the prime of my career" they might be heard to say.

            When management (a G.M.) decides to let a player who has been a great player for the franchise, particularly in New York, where revenues are large, it's due to a lot of players on the team already being paid a lot of money for what they do. There being a finite limit on dollars to pay everyone, as agreed to by everyone, management and players alike.

            No one is being "cheap" here, at least in the case of when a team is spending up to the salary cap.

            The tag line that often goes with the it's a business line is: "Where's the loyalty?"

            How many players are loyal to their teammates enough to give up some of the limited pie to satisfy their teammates desire to "feed their family"?

            How many players are loyal enough to those who made the game a success before them and are suffering greatly today to give up part of that pie to help them?

            If Victor Cruz were to actually get paid $10 million next year, you can guarantee that pie will be short around the table for a number of teammates, and more of them will actually have to be let go.

            Players' agents are the ones, along with the players themselves, that you'll sometimes hear publicly pleading their cause. Rarely, it ever, does management have the same opportunity to pull on emotions (a.k.a. attempted manipulation to gain bargaining leverage for the agent and/or the player's own increase in sheckels.

            This is a business that wouldn't exist were it not for the owners who built it.
            And the pie is rather large for everyone to share. Players agree to the system, and the only ones being "cheated" in any negotiation is the fellow athletes whose pie are collectively being slivered away from them.

            Few ever speak on behalf of the owner or what they've created for all of us to enjoy and the athlete to potentially prosper.

            So, yes, that's the business. For the NFL player, it's gaining money in a competitive scenario in an effort to squeeze it away from other fellow players, and doing so without really thinking in those terms.
            I would argue that the NFL wouldn't exist without the support of the fans.....and seems that they ultimately are the ones who pay.... ticket prices, PSLs, parking fees, concession prices, NFL Sunday ticket, endless commercials, etc.
            "I like linebackers. I collect 'em. You can't have too many good ones." - Bill Parcells

            "Name the starting linebackers from 2007." - Jerry Reese

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            • #21
              Originally posted by joemorrisforprez View Post
              I would argue that the NFL wouldn't exist without the support of the fans.....and seems that they ultimately are the ones who pay.... ticket prices, PSLs, parking fees, concession prices, NFL Sunday ticket, endless commercials, etc.
              We do it because we believe it enhances our lives.
              Taking the risk with your own money, finding the marketplace and building an enterprise like the NFL is a great credit to the owners and front offices of the clubs. Especially those who were there early one, like Wellington Mara.
              The players and fans have benefited tremendously from that.
              Admit nothing. Deny everything. Make counter accusations.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Drez View Post
                The reality of your life and that of an athlete are very different. Do you have hangers-on asking you for money all the time, including family like parents or siblings? Do you only get paid 17 weeks a year? Is the maximum earning potential of your career just a scant 4 or 5 years? Does the culture of your profession encourage frivolous spending?
                Thats why I am saying the phrase, "just trying to feed my family" is a ridiculous statement. Entertainers, athletes and pretty much any celebrity actually receive alot of freebies and it is interesting that the more you make the less you pay on things.

                The amount of money a guy makes for the 17 weeks is more than I make in a life time, even with a percentage going to an agent and etc. I agree with Toad that it is alot of mismanagement of money...and truly I have no problem with what athletes make but to use the phrase above is ridiculous.

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