Ross Tucker, who played 7 years in the NFL including one year with the Cowboys, wrote a column for ESPN in which he talked about a number of things from a player's perspective. It's pretty interesting and if you want to check it out, here's the link. However, this is what jumped out at me the most:



Q: I think I once heard you say that you used to collect your
"used" equipment from each team you played with but that the Cowboys
charged you for some of it. Just wondering how much you paid for a
Cowboys jersey and helmet? Or did you leave them behind? What was their
explanation for being so cheap? Would their policy change in an uncapped
year?
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Paul in New Brunswick, Canada</p>

A: It
has nothing to do with the salary cap, and yes, I have said that the
Cowboys were the only team of five I played for that I recall charging
me via payroll deduction for my helmet. I believe it was $200. I was
told that Jerry Jones looks at equipment as team property, and if a
player wants it, he has to purchase it. I'm a business owner, so on
some level I get it, but I was pretty surprised, given how much money
the Cowboys make. They also were the only team that deducted money for
lunch every week during the season, which was even more astonishing to
me.</p>
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That's pretty surprising to me considering how much money Jerry Jones makes and was willing to spend on the new stadium. Charging a player to keep his helmet is pretty classless if you ask me. Especially since for safety reasons I'm sure helmets only have a limited number of uses before they need to be replaced. I can't imagine that they would have given his helmet to another player.
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