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  1. #1
    Moderator RoanokeFan's Avatar
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    WHAT ELEMENTS DO DAVID WILSON AND RUEBEN RANDLE BRING TO THE GIANTS?

    WHAT ELEMENTS DO DAVID WILSON AND RUEBEN RANDLE BRING TO THE GIANTS?

    "The New York
    Giants
    added two new weapons to their offensive attack in the first two
    rounds of the 2012 NFL Draft in
    running back David
    Wilson
    of Virginia Tech and wide receiver Rueben
    Randle
    of LSU. The two will help offset the losses of Mario
    Manningham
    and Brandon
    Jacobs
    to free agency, but also represent a change in both the Giants
    passing offense and running game.


    Today on Giants 101, we look at the elements Eli Manning's newest weapons
    bring to the Giants attack.




    WR Rueben
    Randle
    vs WR Mario
    Manningham




    While Rueben
    Randle
    and Mario
    Manningham
    do share a common trait in their crafty route running, Randle is
    a very different receiver than Manningham and brings a different skill set to
    the table for the G-Men. Nicks and Cruz are the clear number one and number two
    receiving options for Manning and the New York passing game, but Randle is likely to step in
    and take over Manningham's role as the number three option on the outside (Cruz
    will likely remain in the slot on the majority of the snaps, where he is at his
    best).




    Manningham was a real vertical threat on the outside who was at his best
    working the sideline and taking advantage of one on one opportunities over the
    top. He's elusive and has very good stop and start moves in the open field to
    create extra yardage in space, but wasn't a guy who was going to run through
    tacklers or create much after initial contact.




    Rueben
    Randle
    is more in the mold of an Anquan Boldin or Hakeem Nicks(although
    Nicks is a more explosive athlete and puts more pressure on defenses vertically
    in addition to his physical play over the middle and underneath), and brings a
    bigger target to the table for Manning. He's a tall, long athlete who will be a
    big threat in the red zone with his size, body control, and ability to snatch
    the football
    out of the air. Whereas the majority of Manningham's touchdowns came on fade
    routes to the pylon or on 30 and 40 yard throws, Randle is a guy who can catch
    the ball in traffic, win a jump ball, or catch the ball at the six yard line and
    drag a defender into the end zone.




    RB David
    Wilson
    vs RB Brandon
    Jacobs




    Again, these are two players that are very different in the physical traits
    and skill set they bring to an offense. David
    Wilson
    is an electric runner, who is physical and powerful in his style, but
    is also very capable of breaking a 60 to 70 yard run anytime the football is
    in his hands.




    Brandon
    Jacobs
    was obviously known for his size and the intimidation factor he
    brought to the Giants backfield. He was difficult to bring down with a head of
    steam and it often took multiple tacklers to get Jacobs to the ground.




    Wilson is a smaller back but compares favorably to DeAngelo Williams and Tiki
    Barber. He's tough and competitive and looks to break out of tackles, but also
    has that rare acceleration to beat cornerbacks and safeties to the end zone once
    he gets to the outside. Wilson also brings a receiving threat out of the
    backfield with his soft hands and ability to make big plays in the screen game,
    something we didn't see nearly as much with Jacobs in his time as a Giant.




    OVERALL IMPACT




    In the end, the Giants kind of swapped speed and big play ability from the
    passing game to the running game. They have gotten substantially more explosive
    in their running back group, while adding more size and physicality to their
    receiving core.




    The receiving threat and big play ability on screens Wilson brings to the New York
    backfield should help New York negate some of the blitzes and heavy pass rush
    they will see with their reshuffled offensive line next season, as he is
    certainly capable of making defenses pay on the back end with open field space
    in front of him.




    In the passing game, the Giants have become a little more difficult to
    contend with inside of the twenty, as Randle is another big body that operates
    well in traffic and can win the football in tight spaces(not to mention their addition
    of MartellusBennett earlier in the off-season at tight end)."

    “Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.” MB Rule # 1






    # 80

  2. #2

    Re: WHAT ELEMENTS TO DAVID WILSON AND RUEBEN RANDLE BRING TO THE GIANTS?

    I stopped reading after they said Manningham is a crafty route runner

  3. #3
    All-Pro Drez's Avatar
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    Re: WHAT ELEMENTS TO DAVID WILSON AND RUEBEN RANDLE BRING TO THE GIANTS?

    [quote user="Neverend"]I stopped reading after they said Manningham is a crafty route runner[/quote]
    He was. MM was actually a very good route runner. He'd occasionally lose track of the sideline or run the wrong route (but when he did, he ran the route well).

  4. #4

    Re: WHAT ELEMENTS TO DAVID WILSON AND RUEBEN RANDLE BRING TO THE GIANTS?

    [quote user="Neverend"]I stopped reading after they said Manningham is a crafty route runner[/quote]

    Please, MM ran the wrong routes with extreme precision

  5. #5
    All-Pro JJC7301's Avatar
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    Re: WHAT ELEMENTS DO DAVID WILSON AND RUEBEN RANDLE BRING TO THE GIANTS?

    I'm going to miss BJ and MM, but I'm very excited about DW and RR.

  6. #6

    Re: WHAT ELEMENTS DO DAVID WILSON AND RUEBEN RANDLE BRING TO THE GIANTS?

    MM was an inconsistent route runner. At times, he looked like he was owning the show and then there were moments that Eli would just stare at him, thinking, "Wtf are you doing dude?".

  7. #7
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    Re: WHAT ELEMENTS TO DAVID WILSON AND RUEBEN RANDLE BRING TO THE GIANTS?

    [quote user="Drez"][quote user="Neverend"]I stopped reading after they said Manningham is a crafty route runner[/quote]
    He was. MM was actually a very good route runner. He'd occasionally lose track of the sideline or run the wrong route (but when he did, he ran the route well).
    [/quote]

    +1 In terms of pure route running I thought Manningham was fantastic

  8. #8

    Re: WHAT ELEMENTS TO DAVID WILSON AND RUEBEN RANDLE BRING TO THE GIANTS?

    Then I'd like to know how some define "crafty". To me, when they say crafty I'm assuming they mean polish and savvy.

    The reason why manningham ran out of bounds so much is because he is clueless learning how to get off the line and create room for himself. If he learns how to slow play his release, jab step inside to get a corner on his heels, or use his arm/hands with a rip/swim technique -- he wouldn't run so close to the sidelines as much. I'd also add here he comes off the line too upright as well, letting corners easily get into his body, manningham gets tied up, and runs his way out of bounds routinely

    He has no savvy or understanding of how to get off the line

    And I'm only talking about his release so far. I'm not gonna even address his lacking of a route tree and finding his way open other than just on speed and quickness

    Depending on the definition of what they meant by Manningham being a "crafty route runner", I find that notion just ridiculous.

  9. #9

    Re: WHAT ELEMENTS TO DAVID WILSON AND RUEBEN RANDLE BRING TO THE GIANTS?

    [quote user="NY_Eli"][quote user="Drez"][quote user="Neverend"]I stopped reading after they said Manningham is a crafty route runner[/quote]
    He was. MM was actually a very good route runner. He'd occasionally lose track of the sideline or run the wrong route (but when he did, he ran the route well).
    [/quote]

    +1 In terms of pure route running I thought Manningham was fantastic[/quote]

    i dont know about pure route running, but MM was very crafty in that he could use a variety of moves to gain seperation. he could setup db's with different gears in his speed, he could get a db turned inside out or taking bad angles. MM was certainly crafty i think thats a very good term for him...although i believe i remember toomer or another giants analyst, maybe simms, who said MM was the best route runner in terms of gaining seperation...he def. could get seperation no disputing that

    edit-for example in the SB on that clutch grab, MM was able to get an excellent release to the outside based off of the db's technique...he would mess up quite often, but when he got it right, it was a thing of beauty

  10. #10
    Veteran RagTime Blue's Avatar
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    Re: WHAT ELEMENTS TO DAVID WILSON AND RUEBEN RANDLE BRING TO THE GIANTS?

    [quote user="Neverend"]Then I'd like to know how some define "crafty". To me, when they say crafty I'm assuming they mean polish and savvy.

    The reason why manningham ran out of bounds so much is because he is clueless learning how to get off the line and create room for himself. If he learns how to slow play his release, jab step inside to get a corner on his heels, or use his arm/hands with a rip/swim technique -- he wouldn't run so close to the sidelines as much. I'd also add here he comes off the line too upright as well, letting corners easily get into his body, manningham gets tied up, and runs his way out of bounds routinely

    He has no savvy or understanding of how to get off the line

    And I'm only talking about his release so far. I'm not gonna even address his lacking of a route tree and finding his way open other than just on speed and quickness

    Depending on the definition of what they meant by Manningham being a "crafty route runner", I find that notion just ridiculous.[/quote]

    He was very good at disguising his routes. . .especially to #10.
    We need our coaches to assign playing time based on something other than player salary.

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