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  1. #1
    All-Pro TheAnalyst's Avatar
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    Breaking Down the Giants Run Game:

    Of the 19 run plays the Giants ran against the Cowboys in last Wednesday's opener, 11 went to the left side, seven to the right side and one up the middle (Ahmad Bradshaw's 5-yarder on 3rd-and-16 to end the first half).

    Of those 19 run plays, 11 were on first down, five were on second down, two on third and one on fourth. Bradshaw's biggest run was a 33-yarder on 3rd-and-1 that was a very well blocked play to the side of the line on which the Giants did not have extra blockers. More on that in a second.

    Bradshaw ran the ball 17 times. Rookie David Wilson ran it twice, and not at all after fumbling on his second carry. No other Giants running back got a carry in the game.

    Of the 19 runs, 13 were run to the side of the line on which tight end Martellus Bennett was lined up. That includes the first 10 Giants running plays of the game. The first time Bradshaw runs to the side on which Bennett is not lined up is a 2-yard gain to the right side in the second quarter, and on that play tackle Will Beatty was in the game on the right side as an eligible tight end. The play is basically stopped immediately by Anthony Spencer when he gets off the block of Beatty.

    Right tackle David Diehl had a rough game against Dallas defensive end Jason Hatcher. On the final play of the first half, the Cowboys have only three men on the line and Bradshaw gets the ball and runs right up the middle, but Diehl can't handle Hatcher, who brings Bradshaw down before he can get loose. Not that they were trying to do anything special there, but you never know.

    There are times when Bradshaw shows indecisiveness and a lack of burst that costs him. The play just before the Wilson fumble is a 1st-and-10 on which Bennett motions to the right and Bradshaw runs that way. There appears to be a hole between Bennett and Diehl on that right side, but Bradshaw is unable to slip through before it closes. That play looked like one on which Bradshaw could have gained more. There's also a 1st-and-10 in the fourth quarter on which he's running to the right side, where Bennett and fellow tight end Bear Pascoe are both lined up, and he seems to have a brief opportunity to turn upfield quickly before Bruce Carter fills the gap and brings him down.

    Once they started running away from Bennett's side, the Giants actually had more success. I don't know if this is because Dallas was devoting extra attention to Bennett's side (which would make sense, after the Giants ran their first 10 plays to Bennett's side) or if it's a matter of Dallas focusing more energy on pass defense once they had the lead. But Bennett is on the right side when Bradshaw runs left for a 10-yard touchdown to the left. The touchdown is a very well-blocked play that involves no tight ends. Left guard Kevin Boothe shoves the defensive lineman inside and then blocks Sean Lee. Left tackle Sean Locklear takes care of his man. Fullback Henry Hynoski, lined up in front of Bradshaw in the backfield, swings over and makes his block. Hakeem Nicks is trying to make a block near the goal line as Bradshaw jukes the defensive back and slips into the end zone. Good play all-around, and without extra blockers on that side.

    Continued in link from ESPN:

    http://espn.go.com/blog/nfceast/post...iants-run-game


    5trive for Fiv5

  2. #2
    All-Pro TheAnalyst's Avatar
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    This, to me, shows a couple of things.

    We have no shot at running up the middle. We have no push to open holes or push "backup" DTs backwards to get some yards. 1 run up the middle? We can't continue to not push up the middle with our run attack. Baas needs to figure out how to push a pile or at least open a hole somewhat, which from the looks of it, is a stretch.
    By not running up the middle, we give the edge to the LBs. A LB can just run either right or left off the snap and not worry about the middle, which is why Sean Lee got a great jump off the snap on the Wilson fumble.

    Dallas obviously knew we have no blocking so they loaded the side we had a TE (Bennett) blocking. As the article says, we actually were better running away from the extra blocker. Its just too obvious for defenses on what we are planning to do.

    Lastly I'll point out the fact we try to run early, even if it isnt working, which then puts us in the hole. This is why I scream at my TV for Gilbride to call a play action on 1st and goal when Dallas is stuffing the run with 9 in the box. But he calls a run on first, and then second.

    We need to be 50/50 on first down with the run pass IMO. And we need to be more 50/50 on where we run to keep the defense guessing. We are way to predictable playing the rush attack like this.


    5trive for Fiv5

  3. #3
    Yeah I'd like to see a misdirection too...

    Quote Originally Posted by Mercury View Post
    We need a tight end,
    repeat, again and again
    ToadofSteel's mantra.

  4. #4
    More to the point:

    1) Our oline blocking was mediocre at best. More on this below.

    2) Bradshaw doesn't appear to be running as hard as he has in the past.

    3) Bradshaw doesn't have the same vision as he has in the past (seeing where the hole is).

    4) A lot of runs looked like designed cut back plays (at least they were blocked like that) and the holes were there but Bradshaw either didn't cut back or cut back too late.

    5) We do indeed telegraph our running assignments (we run the majority to the side of the TE and always have under KG).

    6) Dallas was over pursuing the whole game ... we should have done more misdirection on the ground.

    7) David Wilson is most definitely the future.

  5. #5
    All-Pro TheAnalyst's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kruunch View Post
    More to the point:

    1) Our oline blocking was mediocre at best. More on this below.

    2) Bradshaw doesn't appear to be running as hard as he has in the past.

    3) Bradshaw doesn't have the same vision as he has in the past (seeing where the hole is).

    4) A lot of runs looked like designed cut back plays (at least they were blocked like that) and the holes were there but Bradshaw either didn't cut back or cut back too late.

    5) We do indeed telegraph our running assignments (we run the majority to the side of the TE and always have under KG).

    6) Dallas was over pursuing the whole game ... we should have done more misdirection on the ground.

    7) David Wilson is most definitely the future.
    I agree with most of your points, but I still dont think it is Bradshaws inability to make a cut or see the hole that is killing the run. NO ONE can run with this oline. I remember last year Bradhshaw, Jacobs, Ware, it didnt matter. They were getting hit behind the line, or someone was filling the hole he needed to hit and couldnt because of it which makes it look like he is indecisive. The foot injuries may be taking a toll on Bradhsaws running ability, but I dont think it is hurting him right now. I think the Oline is pitiful. Our only lineman who should be a starter right now is Snee.


    5trive for Fiv5

  6. #6
    Why does Snee always get a pass on these boards? He was getting blown up along with the rest of the line. When the entire line is bad, maybe its not 100% the players. I say its bad coaching. Something needs to change there.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Gmenbroinlaw View Post
    Why does Snee always get a pass on these boards? He was getting blown up along with the rest of the line. When the entire line is bad, maybe its not 100% the players. I say its bad coaching. Something needs to change there.
    What has to change is that our entire o-line has to grow some stones and get out there and smack some people in the mouth.

  8. #8
    All-Pro TheAnalyst's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gmenbroinlaw View Post
    Why does Snee always get a pass on these boards? He was getting blown up along with the rest of the line. When the entire line is bad, maybe its not 100% the players. I say its bad coaching. Something needs to change there.
    Because Snee is the best of a bad bunch out there. It isn't the coaching. You can't coach strength and skill. You just have to utilize what you have.


    5trive for Fiv5

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by TheAnalyst View Post
    Because Snee is the best of a bad bunch out there. It isn't the coaching. You can't coach strength and skill. You just have to utilize what you have.
    Being the best of a bad bunch isnt saying much. Certainly not enough that deserves him getting praised every week on the boards. For the coaching... tell that to the strength conditioning coach and the offensive line coach. You can certainly coach technique, timing, teamwork. That is what I see lacking.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Gmenbroinlaw View Post
    Why does Snee always get a pass on these boards? He was getting blown up along with the rest of the line. When the entire line is bad, maybe its not 100% the players. I say its bad coaching. Something needs to change there.
    Because these boards are weird.

    Chris Snee gets a pass because he's Coughlin's son in law.

    David Diehl gets a pass because he's been on the team a long time.

    David Baas doesn't get a pass until someone blames Reese for signing him him the first place...Then Baas gets a pass since Reese can do no wrong.

    Speaking of Reese. Why am I the only one outraged at the fact that he thought it a good idea to replace Manningham with Hixon? The guy is an injury waiting to happen.

    And what was Reese thinking about when he resigned T2??

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