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  1. #1

    3TFO: Browns @ Giants

    https://www.profootballfocus.com/blo...giants-week-5/

    Interesting piece on how Weeden has held up against extra pressure vs. a clean pocket

    No Pressure, Weeden

    What are the proper expectations for a rookie quarterback in today’s NFL? The first-year struggles of previous Hall of Fame QBs make Brandon Weeden’s league-worst -10.9 grade somewhat forgivable. But it’s tough for the Browns’ fans to cut the 29-year old some slack when the supposedly-raw Ryan Tannehill throws for 431 yards. What’s odd about Weeden’s first four NFL games is that his performance declines when defenses don’t pressure him. He’s thrown two touchdowns and three interceptions for a -1.7 grade when under duress, versus one touchdown, four interceptions and a -6.4 mark from a clean pocket. After facing a blitz on just 16.8% of his drop-backs in the first three weeks, Weeden actually held up decently when the Baltimore Ravens blitzed him 49.1% of the time last week. He passed for 322 yards and would have had a lot more if not for a shameful seven drops from his receivers.

    The Giants defense lamented that they played more cautiously after safety Kenny Phillips left last week’s game with a knee injury, but that may be the best move against Weeden. New York’s secondary has been decimated by injuries, and the once-dependable Corey Webster ranks behind all NFL CBs with a -6.0 pass coverage grade this season. Justin Tuck (five QB pressures in four games) and the Giants’ front four has not lived up to their pass rush reputation this season, but Weeden’s struggles when left to his own devices should encourage New York to resist sending extra rushers at the rookie quarterback.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheEnigma View Post
    https://www.profootballfocus.com/blo...giants-week-5/

    Interesting piece on how Weeden has held up against extra pressure vs. a clean pocket

    No Pressure, Weeden

    What are the proper expectations for a rookie quarterback in today’s NFL? The first-year struggles of previous Hall of Fame QBs make Brandon Weeden’s league-worst -10.9 grade somewhat forgivable. But it’s tough for the Browns’ fans to cut the 29-year old some slack when the supposedly-raw Ryan Tannehill throws for 431 yards. What’s odd about Weeden’s first four NFL games is that his performance declines when defenses don’t pressure him. He’s thrown two touchdowns and three interceptions for a -1.7 grade when under duress, versus one touchdown, four interceptions and a -6.4 mark from a clean pocket. After facing a blitz on just 16.8% of his drop-backs in the first three weeks, Weeden actually held up decently when the Baltimore Ravens blitzed him 49.1% of the time last week. He passed for 322 yards and would have had a lot more if not for a shameful seven drops from his receivers.

    The Giants defense lamented that they played more cautiously after safety Kenny Phillips left last week’s game with a knee injury, but that may be the best move against Weeden. New York’s secondary has been decimated by injuries, and the once-dependable Corey Webster ranks behind all NFL CBs with a -6.0 pass coverage grade this season. Justin Tuck (five QB pressures in four games) and the Giants’ front four has not lived up to their pass rush reputation this season, but Weeden’s struggles when left to his own devices should encourage New York to resist sending extra rushers at the rookie quarterback.
    I think our strategy against Weeden should be something similar to this....


  3. #3
    All-Pro joemorrisforprez's Avatar
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    Here is what I remember from the absurd loss against Seattle last season:

    The Giants were faced with a green QB. They decided to lay off th pass rush, and instead dared him to throw. The Seattle QB grew comfortable in the pocket, got confident, and outplayed the defense for a loss at home.

    Deja vu ????


    Here's my idea......a steady run blitz to neutralize Richardson and also create pressure up the middle. Get Webster doing what he does best.....press coverage. In other words, go back to an old-school Spags defense that the defenders enjoy playing.

    If the defense gives up some big plays, well, we've got an offense, too.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by joemorrisforprez View Post
    Here is what I remember from the absurd loss against Seattle last season:

    The Giants were faced with a green QB. They decided to lay off th pass rush, and instead dared him to throw. The Seattle QB grew comfortable in the pocket, got confident, and outplayed the defense for a loss at home.

    Deja vu ????


    Here's my idea......a steady run blitz to neutralize Richardson and also create pressure up the middle. Get Webster doing what he does best.....press coverage. In other words, go back to an old-school Spags defense that the defenders enjoy playing.

    If the defense gives up some big plays, well, we've got an offense, too.
    Webster has been burnt more when he has played press versus zone coverage. The dude needs to play with a cushion or else he risks the possibility of giving up big time yards. Prince is really the only DB I feel comfortable playing any consistent press coverage atm.

    Right now, we have statistical proof that Weeden excelled against a steady blitz from a Ravens team with a superior defense. He seems to struggle when he is free to make his own decisions with multiple defenders thrown in the backfield. If he faces a blitz too often, he will diagnose it quickly and take advantage of the holes.

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