+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22
  1. #1
    Bench Player rtahsin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    69

    General Football Question

    So I was watching one of those break down videos on nfl.com where they essentially break down the offensive/defensive plays that stood out during the game. One that I really like was when the Saints ran a play where they get ready to run a screen play, however, its just a decoy to get Jimmy Graham open. The defenders bite and he's wide open.

    So here's my question: Can offensive coordinator, seeing a play they like, use a play by other offensive coordinators for example the one I just mentioned or is there an unwritten rule in the nfl that prohibits that. I guess a good argument to this would be if each offensive coordinator patented a play then almost every offense in the league would be very predictable and ineffective. But I'm talking about the really unique and iconic plays that make people say that only so and so coordinator would run that. I'd really love to see KG run that play. Either he already has and I haven't noticed or simply has not.

    Would it be something like when back in the 80's Buddy Ryan introduced the 46 defense? That defense was almost exclusively used by him. But then as time progressed and other defensive coordinators saw the effectiveness of it, they accepted it into their repertoire and after a while became a normal defensive formation.

    Just a curious question from a football newbie who wants to increase his understanding of football.
    “Fall down seven times, get up eight.”

  2. #2
    All-Pro ny06's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    13,808
    It's a copy cat league.

    Giants fan since the early 80s

  3. #3
    Any coordinator can copy any play he sees.

  4. #4
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    1,990
    Quote Originally Posted by rtahsin View Post
    So I was watching one of those break down videos on nfl.com where they essentially break down the offensive/defensive plays that stood out during the game. One that I really like was when the Saints ran a play where they get ready to run a screen play, however, its just a decoy to get Jimmy Graham open. The defenders bite and he's wide open.

    So here's my question: Can offensive coordinator, seeing a play they like, use a play by other offensive coordinators for example the one I just mentioned or is there an unwritten rule in the nfl that prohibits that. I guess a good argument to this would be if each offensive coordinator patented a play then almost every offense in the league would be very predictable and ineffective. But I'm talking about the really unique and iconic plays that make people say that only so and so coordinator would run that. I'd really love to see KG run that play. Either he already has and I haven't noticed or simply has not.

    Would it be something like when back in the 80's Buddy Ryan introduced the 46 defense? That defense was almost exclusively used by him. But then as time progressed and other defensive coordinators saw the effectiveness of it, they accepted it into their repertoire and after a while became a normal defensive formation.

    Just a curious question from a football newbie who wants to increase his understanding of football.
    Nope they absolutely can use any plays they see that other teams have utilized.

  5. #5
    Bench Player rtahsin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    69
    This makes me think. Why don't we use more screen plays? Is it because our blocking sucks?
    “Fall down seven times, get up eight.”

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by rtahsin View Post
    So I was watching one of those break down videos on nfl.com where they essentially break down the offensive/defensive plays that stood out during the game. One that I really like was when the Saints ran a play where they get ready to run a screen play, however, its just a decoy to get Jimmy Graham open. The defenders bite and he's wide open.

    So here's my question: Can offensive coordinator, seeing a play they like, use a play by other offensive coordinators for example the one I just mentioned or is there an unwritten rule in the nfl that prohibits that. I guess a good argument to this would be if each offensive coordinator patented a play then almost every offense in the league would be very predictable and ineffective. But I'm talking about the really unique and iconic plays that make people say that only so and so coordinator would run that. I'd really love to see KG run that play. Either he already has and I haven't noticed or simply has not.

    Would it be something like when back in the 80's Buddy Ryan introduced the 46 defense? That defense was almost exclusively used by him. But then as time progressed and other defensive coordinators saw the effectiveness of it, they accepted it into their repertoire and after a while became a normal defensive formation.

    Just a curious question from a football newbie who wants to increase his understanding of football.
    Just Like all Posters stated, No Patent or Copyright Rights Apply...........Just Like Teams all over use the West coast offense.

    example : .WEST COAST OFFENSE OVERVIEW


    http://www.westcoastoffense.com/overview.htm
    Last edited by BillTheGreek; 11-30-2012 at 11:04 AM.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by rtahsin View Post
    This makes me think. Why don't we use more screen plays? Is it because our blocking sucks?
    We used to when we had Tiki Barber (one of the best screen backs of his time). Then when he left, we started throwing more bubble screens (WR screens). Since 2010 we've been a more vertical team.

    I wouldn't mind seeing more screens, but they tend to only work really well against aggressive and undisciplined defenses. Many OLBs and DEs in today's NFL can smell a screen a mile away.

  8. #8
    Bench Player rtahsin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    69
    Quote Originally Posted by Kruunch View Post
    We used to when we had Tiki Barber (one of the best screen backs of his time). Then when he left, we started throwing more bubble screens (WR screens). Since 2010 we've been a more vertical team.

    I wouldn't mind seeing more screens, but they tend to only work really well against aggressive and undisciplined defenses. Many OLBs and DEs in today's NFL can smell a screen a mile away.
    I agree but when the Saints use the screen effectively on virtually any team it makes me jealous. Is it maybe because Eli doesn't put enough zip on the ball so the defense doesn't have time to react and the blockers don't have to wait for the ball to get there and just block.

    Maybe it's just me but I think if Eli put a little hot sauce on the ball, the screen would be more effective.
    “Fall down seven times, get up eight.”

  9. #9
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    4,340
    I think the ability to sell the screen by the o-line is the key. If they can sell that they are trying to block and getting beat...the screen has a chance because the defender is thinking he is winning the battle and continue to aggressively rush the QB. However, if he makes it too easy and the defender senses this, he will stop rushing and start looking for a back trying to sneak out of the backfield.

    Obviously, this is not the case when you run the screen to the WR.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by rtahsin View Post
    I agree but when the Saints use the screen effectively on virtually any team it makes me jealous. Is it maybe because Eli doesn't put enough zip on the ball so the defense doesn't have time to react and the blockers don't have to wait for the ball to get there and just block.

    Maybe it's just me but I think if Eli put a little hot sauce on the ball, the screen would be more effective.
    Eli doesn't throw the best screen in the world no. Accordingly, Bradshaw isn't the best screen back in the world either (certainly not as good at it as Darren Sproles is).

    Also, since we run the ball a bit more, that tends to keep the box a little more congested, making the screen not as productive (and also why we tend to go vertical a lot).

    We could block a screen just fine if it were our bread and butter but to have guys do that really well, you usually need to run it more than we do.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts