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Thread: Are Right Tackles regaining value?

  1. #1

    Are Right Tackles regaining value?

    The blind side. Itís a movie. Itís the left tackleís responsibility to protect. But is it overvalued?

    To begin, Iíd like to admit that I came into this project slightly biased as I believe the swing toward the passing game in the NFL necessitates a team has two good offensive tackles, not just one. The old adage that you put your best pass protector at left tackle (the blind side) and your mauling run blocker at right tackle (teams used to run to the right more often) is outdated.

    Iím also of the belief that scouting jargon such as, ďheís a right tackle onlyĒ no longer holds water as NFL offenses are less predictable with regard to run direction, while NFL defenses are more unpredictable with their dispersing of pass rushing talent. In other words, the left and right tackles both need to run block and pass block with equal acumen.

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  2. #2
    This really puts the Justin Pugh selection in another perspective. If one is to believe this article (why not?) and the statistics that show majority of the pressure comes from the right tackle position, we could be seeing a trend for the importance of having bookend tackles.

  3. #3
    Starter PBTimmons's Avatar
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    I was reading an article in a recent SI and they basically said the same thing without stats to back it up. It seems the 'Parcells-ian' way of building a team may be on its way out. IE. build your team around 3 players: 1 QB, 1 LT and 1 Pass Rusher.

    I'm of the opinion that: Take (1) 'Worst team in the NFL' ADD (1) Rookie 'stud' LT and you don't have an overnight playoff team.

    As much as the Chiefs have done, they didn't need nor did they improve their team by taking Eric Fisher. I believe they would have been better served taking different guy.
    Quote Originally Posted by PBTimmons View Post
    This. Pugh is not happening. Not. Happening.

  4. #4
    The left tackle is still more important because like you said he is protecting the QB from his blind side (assuming your QB is right handed). So in the Giants' case LT is far more important. I don't have any data to support it, but I would guess that far more strip sacks come from the QB's blind side. Thus the reason you want your best at LT. It makes sense since there is more of a chance for the QB to protect the football when he can see the blitz coming from the right side.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by nhpgiantsfan View Post
    The left tackle is still more important because like you said he is protecting the QB from his blind side (assuming your QB is right handed). So in the Giants' case LT is far more important. I don't have any data to support it, but I would guess that far more strip sacks come from the QB's blind side. Thus the reason you want your best at LT. It makes sense since there is more of a chance for the QB to protect the football when he can see the blitz coming from the right side.
    I would have thought that same thing but it's really not as much as we believed.

    - Since 2008, pressures from left tackle resulted in a sack and forced fumble only 1.9 percent more than pressures from right tackle. That’s good for less than four forced fumbles per season. As much as the blind side strip sack sticks in our memory banks, it only occurs slightly more than the forced fumble from the front side.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by nhpgiantsfan View Post
    The left tackle is still more important because like you said he is protecting the QB from his blind side (assuming your QB is right handed). So in the Giants' case LT is far more important. I don't have any data to support it, but I would guess that far more strip sacks come from the QB's blind side. Thus the reason you want your best at LT. It makes sense since there is more of a chance for the QB to protect the football when he can see the blitz coming from the right side.
    I agree with this to a point.....I will ask 1 question.....Osi's claim to fame was the strip sack ...Strahahn was, I think a consensus better player......which player would you want your better tackle going against?
    "When I was 15, I could not believe how dumb my father was.....when I was 25, I could not believe how much he had learned in 10 years"

    1st to use the phrase "In Reese we trust"

  7. #7
    Aren't we also switching JPP to LDE? Maybe it's less to do with having our best run stopper there but to also give him better chances to pass rush a weaker pass protector?

  8. #8
    All-Pro TheAnalyst's Avatar
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    I always thought the LT was for the best tackle, and the #2 tackle on your team would be the RT. So just always get the best option at LT available and you can always switch him over. I also feel it isnt as much of a jump for a tackle to move inside to the guard spot. The only spot that really needs a different skill is the center. You need a pure center (not Boothe) to have a dominant line. Someone you arent worried about the snap either shotgun, pistol or direct. Someone who can provide push and has strength to deal with a NT. Someone who can be the QB of the OL to shift and pointout defensive adjustments.

    The tackle spots are still very important dude to the pass rush, but as the acticle says, the LT and RT are almost interchangable now as much as the LDE and RDE are.

    A big reason I didnt really enjoy the Pugh pick is because I see him having half the value of those tackles drafted up front. IMO, he wont be able to play LT or RT in the NFL unless he gets his strength up, and thats a big if for a #19 pick. AS a Cuse fan, I saw how he was during the past few years. He looked solid at LT for the Orange in a fast paced, quick pass offense, something the Giants dont run. You know gilbride and Eli like milking the clock down to 1 before the snap every play. This allows defenses to adjust and put there best pass rusher on Pugh instead of Beatty on passing situations if those are the starting tackles.
    "Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the mouth."

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by TheAnalyst View Post
    A big reason I didnt really enjoy the Pugh pick is because I see him having half the value of those tackles drafted up front. IMO, he wont be able to play LT or RT in the NFL unless he gets his strength up, and thats a big if for a #19 pick. AS a Cuse fan, I saw how he was during the past few years. He looked solid at LT for the Orange in a fast paced, quick pass offense, something the Giants dont run. You know gilbride and Eli like milking the clock down to 1 before the snap every play. This allows defenses to adjust and put there best pass rusher on Pugh instead of Beatty on passing situations if those are the starting tackles.
    Well I do believe from the film I watched on Pugh, he might actually translate better to handling speed rushers on 3rd down like your Von Millers or Barkevious Mingos (just throwing out body types) than a traditional LDE who could easily get into his pads and overpower him with a bull rush. NFL teams reportedly do use the services of PFF and perhaps this data helped influence the Giants to shore up the RT spot. Diehl was just too big of a weakness there to continue having him start.

    Do you have any idea how many 5 or 7 step drops Syracuse employs in comparison to the Gilbride offense? If the Orange are using 3 step drops to the amount you say they are, Pugh could have an initial adjustment period that is rough.

  10. #10
    All-Pro TheAnalyst's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheEnigma View Post
    Well I do believe from the film I watched on Pugh, he might actually translate better to handling speed rushers on 3rd down like your Von Millers or Barkevious Mingos (just throwing out body types) than a traditional LDE who could easily get into his pads and overpower him with a bull rush. NFL teams reportedly do use the services of PFF and perhaps this data helped influence the Giants to shore up the RT spot. Diehl was just too big of a weakness there to continue having him start.

    Do you have any idea how many 5 or 7 step drops Syracuse employs in comparison to the Gilbride offense? If the Orange are using 3 step drops to the amount you say they are, Pugh could have an initial adjustment period that is rough.
    I dont have exact numbers, but they really didnt use the long drop backs much. Nassib seemed to always get the ball off quickly, and when his receivers were covered tight, he would use a scramble mobility that Eli doesnt have. Thats why I am a bit worried with him as a tackle. He is more of a run blocker then a pass blocker. He is very good at runblocking though so that could be huge for Wilson / Brown. Cuse run game is what really kept them alive the past few seasons with average running backs.
    "Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the mouth."

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