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  1. #11
    looks like JR is ahead of the curve bc the Pugh selection follows suit with the article. Pugh appears to be a much more NFL ready pass protector than run mauler, esp at RT. But I feel JR is aware that our RT will face D.Ware, B.Orakpo (or Kerrigan), and Philly with their stable of pass rushers...

    I bet we see the league start to transition to the GMs like JR who value versatility. Pugh can play LT if need be I'd bet, and we know he can play both LG and RG...

  2. #12
    what theanalyst? Syracuse runs a read and react type offense like we do. They utilize plenty of 5 and 7 step drops, I have no idea what ur seeing.

  3. #13
    The article is silly.

    Left Tackles and Right Tackles in a perfect world should be of equal value, however in the real world one rarely gets the chance to have two perfect walls at both OT spots.

    The primary difference between LT and RT is that most QBs are right handed. So when they drop back they naturally face towards the right, as their right shoulder dips back in preparation to throw. This means that the QB is, by default, facing the right side and seeing any rush coming from that side. Accordingly, they can react if a blitzer or pass rusher on that side comes free. Conversely, the left side becomes the "blindside". That's where a defense will naturally put their best past rusher and thus where the best pass protector should be. Hence why LTs are so important.

    Now defenses will attempt to shift pass rushers around and/or blitz from different sides and angles, stunt, twist, etc ... all of this is to disrupt and confuse the aforementioned paradigm. However, the premise is still the same ... a right handed QB will face towards the right side naturally, and the left side will almost always be a blind spot for him, so you want the guy you trust most to protect that side.

    So when a scout says "that guy is only a RT" what they are really saying is he's a capable OT, but 20% of the time (or pick your arbitrary number) allows a rusher to come free. So we don't TOTALLY trust him. Conversely, a scout saying "this guy is a pure LT" is the same as saying this guy is a total wall and never (or almost never) allows pressures and free rushers so this is the guy we naturally want to protect the blind side of our QB.

    As for running right vs. left, that's a very mixed stat. Most people are right handed. Most right handed people tend to naturally go to their right better than going to their left. That's the only reason you see run plays designed to the right more than the left (specific personnel aside). This is obviously very subject to who the RB is, and how strong (and where that strength is) on the OL in question.

    ADDENDUM: obviously the more you pass, the more important pass protection in general becomes (hence the perceived increase in value of RTs).
    Last edited by Kruunch; 05-03-2013 at 12:13 PM.
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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kruunch View Post
    The article is silly.

    Left Tackles and Right Tackles in a perfect world should be of equal value, however in the real world one rarely gets the chance to have two perfect walls at both OT spots.

    The primary difference between LT and RT is that most QBs are right handed. So when they drop back they naturally face towards the right, as their right shoulder dips back in preparation to throw. This means that the QB is, by default, facing the right side and seeing any rush coming from that side. Accordingly, they can react if a blitzer or pass rusher on that side comes free. Conversely, the left side becomes the "blindside". That's where a defense will naturally put their best past rusher and thus where the best pass protector should be. Hence why LTs are so important.

    Now defenses will attempt to shift pass rushers around and/or blitz from different sides and angles, stunt, twist, etc ... all of this is to disrupt and confuse the aforementioned paradigm. However, the premise is still the same ... a right handed QB will face towards the right side naturally, and the left side will almost always be a blind spot for him, so you want the guy you trust most to protect that side.

    So when a scout says "that guy is only a RT" what they are really saying is he's a capable OT, but 20% of the time (or pick your arbitrary number) allows a rusher to come free. So we don't TOTALLY trust him. Conversely, a scout saying "this guy is a pure LT" is the same as saying this guy is a total wall and never (or almost never) allows pressures and free rushers so this is the guy we naturally want to protect the blind side of our QB.

    As for running right vs. left, that's a very mixed stat. Most people are right handed. Most right handed people tend to naturally go to their right better than going to their left. That's the only reason you see run plays designed to the right more than the left (specific personnel aside). This is obviously very subject to who the RB is, and how strong (and where that strength is) on the OL in question.
    I agree with your post up until the last paragraph. If you think about it, being right handed QB would make running to the left easier because of how the QB hands the ball off. If your basic running play goes to the left, when the ball is snapped the QB will take a step backwards with his left foot, open his hips and he will deliver the ball to the runnning back with his right hand, and the way the running back takes the ball on a hand off should make it easy for him to put the ball in either hand. The opposite is true if the running play goes to the right side, and one could argue that running to the left is safer because of the QB/RB exchange, in the case of a right handed QB of course. I really don't think the whole superiority thing of LT vs RT is really applicable in the running game since the QB can be blind either way depending on where the run is designed to go.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by ShakeandBake View Post
    I agree with your post up until the last paragraph. If you think about it, being right handed QB would make running to the left easier because of how the QB hands the ball off. If your basic running play goes to the left, when the ball is snapped the QB will take a step backwards with his left foot, open his hips and he will deliver the ball to the runnning back with his right hand, and the way the running back takes the ball on a hand off should make it easy for him to put the ball in either hand. The opposite is true if the running play goes to the right side, and one could argue that running to the left is safer because of the QB/RB exchange, in the case of a right handed QB of course. I really don't think the whole superiority thing of LT vs RT is really applicable in the running game since the QB can be blind either way depending on where the run is designed to go.
    Surely almost all QBs are 'ambidextrous' enough to be able to hand the ball off safely with either hand. On the other hand (foot?), right-handed RBs are usually more comfortable going to their right than their left. For one thing, it's more natural to carry the ball in their right hand than their left. Similarly, it's easier to plant the right foot and cut to the left than vice-versa.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Astorian View Post
    Surely almost all QBs are 'ambidextrous' enough to be able to hand the ball off safely with either hand. On the other hand (foot?), right-handed RBs are usually more comfortable going to their right than their left. For one thing, it's more natural to carry the ball in their right hand than their left. Similarly, it's easier to plant the right foot and cut to the left than vice-versa.
    That may be true, but it seems that a lot of fumbles happen during the hand off exchange. You could argue that a QB should be ambidextrous, but then should he be comfortable enough to step back with his left foot as much as his right? Anyway, the point I was trying to make was that it is arguable either way, and that in the running game Right Tackles are just as valuable as Left Tackles. In the passing game it is a completely different story.

  7. #17
    Veteran ryan12's Avatar
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    every postion on the oline is important
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  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by ShakeandBake View Post
    I agree with your post up until the last paragraph. If you think about it, being right handed QB would make running to the left easier because of how the QB hands the ball off. If your basic running play goes to the left, when the ball is snapped the QB will take a step backwards with his left foot, open his hips and he will deliver the ball to the runnning back with his right hand, and the way the running back takes the ball on a hand off should make it easy for him to put the ball in either hand. The opposite is true if the running play goes to the right side, and one could argue that running to the left is safer because of the QB/RB exchange, in the case of a right handed QB of course. I really don't think the whole superiority thing of LT vs RT is really applicable in the running game since the QB can be blind either way depending on where the run is designed to go.
    All QBs learn to hand off with either hand.
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  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Kruunch View Post
    The article is silly.

    Left Tackles and Right Tackles in a perfect world should be of equal value, however in the real world one rarely gets the chance to have two perfect walls at both OT spots.

    The primary difference between LT and RT is that most QBs are right handed. So when they drop back they naturally face towards the right, as their right shoulder dips back in preparation to throw. This means that the QB is, by default, facing the right side and seeing any rush coming from that side. Accordingly, they can react if a blitzer or pass rusher on that side comes free. Conversely, the left side becomes the "blindside". That's where a defense will naturally put their best past rusher and thus where the best pass protector should be. Hence why LTs are so important.

    Now defenses will attempt to shift pass rushers around and/or blitz from different sides and angles, stunt, twist, etc ... all of this is to disrupt and confuse the aforementioned paradigm. However, the premise is still the same ... a right handed QB will face towards the right side naturally, and the left side will almost always be a blind spot for him, so you want the guy you trust most to protect that side.

    So when a scout says "that guy is only a RT" what they are really saying is he's a capable OT, but 20% of the time (or pick your arbitrary number) allows a rusher to come free. So we don't TOTALLY trust him. Conversely, a scout saying "this guy is a pure LT" is the same as saying this guy is a total wall and never (or almost never) allows pressures and free rushers so this is the guy we naturally want to protect the blind side of our QB.
    You're talking about an initial 1-2 second window where the right handed QBs always face towards their dominant side but when they do throw towards the left side of the field (which is only a few times less than people actually believe in comparison to the right), they have to turn their body facing the left side of the field so they can properly scan and read the secondary. At this point, the right side is now blind to them and not the left. Pressure rarely happens in that initial window you are speaking of in this post.

  10. #20
    All-Pro slipknottin's Avatar
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    I dont think either OT is gaining value, they are losing value, IMO.

    This past draft just had no talent at other positions. Was all at either OL or DT.

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