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    Moderator RoanokeFan's Avatar
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    NEWS, NOTES, RUMORS, AND GOSSIP: SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2012 - 11:42 A.M.

    HERE NOW THE NEWS

    THE DATA WILL UPDATE THROUGHOUT THE DAY AND SHOW THE UPDATE TIME IN THE HEADER.

    NFC EAST DIVISION CHAMPIONS
    NFC CONFERENCE CHAMPIONS
    WORLD CHAMPIONS - SUPER BOWL XLVI

    NEWARK STAR LEDGER

    NO PERFORMANCE-BASED PAY FOR NFL PLAYERS THIS YEAR

    "
    From 2002 through the 2009 season, the NFL had a system in which players who
    had big seasons on little salaries would be somewhat compensated in the form of
    performance-based pay.



    Last year, following the uncapped season, such players didn't get those
    checks. This year, they won't get them either.




    Per NFL Players Association spokesman Carl Francis, there will be no
    performance-based pay pursuant to the 2011 season, meaning players such as the
    Giants' Victor Cruz and Hakeem Nicks will
    miss out on a few hundred thousand bucks.




    Francis wrote in an email that money has been allocated elsewhere to overall
    salaries and benefits following the lockout and the agreement on a new
    collective bargaining agreement. One example of where such money has been
    redirected was the $3-million salary-cap exemption teams received to keep
    veterans this past season. This season, teams will have three $1.5-million
    exemptions.




    According to Francis, performance-based pay is a part of the new CBA and will
    be paid out in the future, though the league and the union are "still
    negotiating the language."




    Following the 2009 season, the league handed out over $109 million in
    performance-based pay. Vikings center John Sullivan led the league with a
    $397,555 check. (Sullivan
    finally got his big payday
    this past December.) Cornerback Bruce Johnson led
    the Giants that year with $270,766
    .




    Cruz, who set a franchise-record with 1,536 yards, was a starter for much of
    the second half of the regular season, so he would've been high on the list this
    season after making only $450,000 in base salary. Nicks, who earned a $575,000
    base salary, started 15 games. Tight end Jake Ballard and defensive tackle
    Linval Joseph, both of whom earned $450,000 in base salary in 2011, are two
    other players who probably would've received a check close to their salary.




    Cruz said in an
    interview with ProFootballTalk.com
    after the Super Bowl, "I feel like I
    deserve to be paid more money at this point," though he reiterated later in the
    day he'd let
    his agents handle the business side of things
    . Performance-based pay
    wouldn't have been a multi-million deal, but a check might've helped soften the
    blow. There are no indications at this point Cruz plans to take a hard stance in
    negotiations, such as a holdout.




    * * * *




    All of the above may or may not be news to folks. But considering even a few
    agents were expecting PBP checks for their players, I figured it would be news
    to many.




    * * * *




    Meanwhile, TheLantern.com is reporting former Giants defensive coordinator
    Bill Sheridan has
    accepted a job in the same role with the Buccaneers
    , joining former Giants
    quarterbacks coach Mike Sullivan and former Rutgers coach Greg Schiano on the
    Bucs' staff.




    Sheridan had one miserable year as the Giants' coordinator in 2009 before
    being fired the day after the season ended. He was the Dolphins' linebackers
    coach the past two years and recently accepted a position on Urban Meyer's staff
    at Ohio State. But that obviously didn't last very long.




    The Giants face the Buccaneers at MetLife Stadium next season. The date of
    the game is to be determined."

    http://www.nj.com/giants/

    NY DAILY NEWS

    MY TORTURED RELATIONSHIP WITH THE NEW YORK GIANTS

    "One of the few aphorisms I have committed to memory is
    a Nick Hornby line from “Fever Pitch”: “The natural state of the football fan is
    bitter disappointment, no matter what the score.” Hornby is talking about
    soccer, not American football, but the idea translates well. I am a lifelong
    football miserabilist, and more specifically a New York Giants miserabilist.

    Now, you might find it preposterous that anyone could
    be made miserable by a team that has won two of the last five Super Bowls. But
    the roots of my Giants miserabilism run deep. My father, otherwise an uncommonly
    cheerful man, approached Giants fandom as a Viennese-style exercise in high
    neurosis. I inherited this perverse trait from him. Whether it was in the
    stadium or at home, he and I watched every game in a sustained state of anxiety,
    forever envisioning worst-case scenarios.


    It helped that the Giants were adept at realizing such
    scenarios, being a losing team for all but two years of the ’70s. The lowlight
    of my childhood came against the Philadelphia Eagles in 1978, when the Giants’
    quarterback, Joe Pisarcik — who needed only to take a knee to preserve a victory
    — was ordered to hand off the ball to the running back Larry Csonka. It’s well
    documented that the handoff was botched and that the Eagles’ Herman Edwards
    scooped up the fumble and ran it in for the game-winning touchdown. Less well
    known is that my father, watching this scene unfold on TV, dove over the coffee
    table and onto our living-room carpet in a futile attempt to recover the ball.


    Our miserabilism was clearly a hedge against
    heartbreak, but even when the Giants started winning in the Bill Parcells years,
    it didn’t abate. The Super Bowl victories of ’87 and ’91? We greeted them more
    with relief than with exultation.


    In 2007, my father told me that he no longer felt up
    to attending games at the stadium; at 76, he had become too hobbled to endure
    the stairs and the crowds. The first Sunday of that season was like one of those
    time-jump edits in movies — as if a P.O.V. camera, fixed on a 2006 view of my
    dad to my right, swung forward to regard the field and then swung back to my
    right to reveal . . . my new companion, my 8-year-old son. I felt a needly
    sensation in my sinuses — the beginnings of tears. But I held them in. I was a
    miserabilist, not a sentimentalist.


    The Giants made an improbable run in the playoffs that
    season, advancing to the Super Bowl with an overtime road victory over the Green
    Bay Packers, an outcome my father and I discussed with wonderment over the
    phone. But in the week before Super Bowl XLII, Dad fell gravely ill with
    pneumonia and was hospitalized. One of the last things he said to me, mustering
    all his strength simply to lift the oxygen mask from his face, was, “The Giants
    are gonna win!” — a curiously unmiserabilist sentiment.


    My father died that Saturday night, the eve of the big
    game. The funeral was scheduled for Monday. In my grief, I didn’t want to spend
    Super Bowl Sunday watching the undefeated New England Patriots dismantle my
    Giants. But my wise wife insisted that my son and I turn on the game. A game
    that the Giants, absurdly, won.


    The miserabilist take on this sequence of events is
    that it was just like the Giants: the team just had to pull off its
    greatest-ever win a day too late for my dad and me to enjoy it together. But I
    prefer to think of what happened as sweetly apt. My memories of that victory
    will always be tempered by thoughts of my father’s death, and my sadness over my
    father’s death will always be mitigated by the euphoria — yes, euphoria —
    produced by that victory.


    You’d think that this year’s Super Bowl victory, so
    eerily similar to the last, would make me question the very foundations of my
    miserabilism. Yet two Sundays ago, my son, now 12, took turns with me lamenting,
    “That’s it, ballgame over!” every time the Patriots’ Tom Brady completed a pass
    downfield. We just can’t help ourselves; the 2.0 iteration of father-son
    miserabilism in our family is arguably more ridiculous than the original.


    But when Brady’s final throw fell incomplete at Rob
    Gronkowski’s ankles in the end zone, my son leapt into my arms, both of us
    wailing primally — our emotions a whirl of joy, disbelief and remembrance of our
    absent patriarch. Miserabilism is a volatile compound. But a part of it is, I
    suppose, happiness."

    http://www.nytimes.com/pages/sports/football/index.html

    GIANTS 101

    LINEBACKER NO LONGER A NEED OR A WEAKNESS FOR GIANTS

    "The New York Football
    Giants are famous for their mid-eighties to early-nineties linebackers – the
    “Big Blue Wreckin’ Crew”, if you will.



    New York
    Giants
    players Mathias Kiwanuka (94), Derrick Martin (C), and Chase
    Blackburn
    (93) wait on the sidelines during practice for the NFL Super Bowl
    XLVI in Indianapolis, February 2, 2012. The New York
    Giants
    will play the New England Patriots on February 5. REUTERS/Jeff Haynes
    (UNITED STATES - Tags: SPORT FOOTBALL)















    Things have changed in the game, but the defensive memories haven’t. The
    upcoming date in March (Free Agency) is usually the preamble to the annual
    calling for a new face at linebacker that will hopefully be deemed a
    difference-maker.




    Jersey's of past playmakers at the position can still be seen at any Giants
    sports event: Lawrence Taylor, Harry Carson, Carl Banks, Gary Reasons and Pepper
    Johnson to name a few. One quite important point is that these great linebackers
    played in a base 3-4 defense. Their role was more heavily relied-upon for
    pressure than current years’ 4-3 base defense. The 3-4 actually puts a premium
    tag on the linebacker position as far as importance (cue the "they should switch
    to a 3-4" chatter).




    Since the New York
    Giants
    actually became well-known for their fearsome pass-rush, the reality
    of the need for a big-name LB has (to the doubt of many) diminished. The 4-3
    base utilizes the stress of pressure from the front four. It is, without a
    doubt, why the fact that a defensive end getting drafted in the first round is
    no longer such a joke for this franchise. “You can never have too many pass
    rushers” was a firm belief of since-retired Giants General Manager Ernie
    Accorsi, and it’s worked for the types of defenses run here as of late –
    especially with Defensive Coordinators Steve Spagnuolo and Perry Fewell.




    The current roster of linebackers: Michael
    Boley
    , Mathias Kiwanuka, Chase
    Blackburn
    , Jacquian Williams, Greg
    Jones
    , Mark Herzlich, Spencer Paysinger, Jonathan
    Goff
    and Clint
    Sintim
    aren’t “Big Name/Game” guys. They are, rather, hard-working,
    team-oriented, blue-collar, give-all-they’ve-got players that don’t mind coming
    off the field in the heavily-used nickel and dime packages. They play special
    teams and take pride in doing anything to contribute to a positive outcome for
    the New York Football
    Team. They’re humble guys with big hearts for football…and they “fit” on this team.




    It’s a hard time to decide upon the future of some of these linebackers as
    General Manager, Jerry Reese prepares for March and Free Agency, then April and
    the 2012 NFL Draft.




    Neither has “Linebacker” in the pressing “Need” column.

    WITH GIANTS' GM JERRY REESE, EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED

    "2011 kicked off for the New York
    Giants
    with General Manager Jerry Reese taking heat in the media for "not
    making any moves." He defended his approach by saying that sometimes going out
    and making a lot of "sexy moves" isn't the right thing to do.


    For those of you expecting him to start making such moves, don't bank on it.
    In fact, Reese may even be forced to make a few more very "un-sexy moves" before
    the 2012 offseason comes to a close.




    The New York
    Giants
    have the 6thhighest amount of money on the books this offseason, behind
    only the Pittsburgh Steelers, Dallas Cowboys, New York Jets, Carolina Panthers, and Oakland Raiders.
    The salary cap number has not been set yet, but there could be some casualties
    of the 2012 cap once the number is indeed set.




    Lets take a look at the 10 highest cap numbers (salary + bonuses) this coming
    season for the Giants (according to Spotrac).




    1. Eli Manning – $15,190,475




    2. Antrel Rolle – $9,100,000




    3. Justin Tuck – $8,000,000




    4. Chris Snee – $7,783, 333




    5. Chris Canty – $7,666,667




    6. Brandon Jacobs – $6,862,500




    7. Corey Webster – $6,750,000




    8. Micheal Boley – $5,650,000




    9. Mathias Kiwanuka – $5,550,000




    10. David Baas – $4,950,000




    Just missed – Ahmad Bradshaw and Osi Umenyiora with numbers just over
    $4,000,000




    Everyone knows the story with Umenyioraby now; he wants a new contract, so
    his number is either going to go up or disappear entirely. The Giants didn't
    give up on him during the draft day trade scenario back in 2004 and they didn't
    give up on him this preseason either. After coming back and playing as well as
    he did, now is either the perfect time to strike and deal him away, or it is
    time to accept that he is an upper echelon pass rusher and he does indeed
    deserve to get paid.




    The way I see it, Umenyiora is going to get paid. He and MichealBoley's
    presence on the field had the highest correlation with the team winning. More so
    than Justin Tuck or anyone else who was in and out of the lineup.




    The two names on that list who's presence had the lowest correlation with the
    team winning are likely Bradshaw and Jacobs. Combined they barely eclipsed 1,200
    yards rushing this season. The offensive line was an unmitigated disaster at
    times sure, but Jacobs will now be a year older and Bradshaw has broken his feet
    every year in the NFL. It is
    nearly impossible for both to stay.




    The player on that list most likely to re-negotiate is Chris Canty. Rolle
    comes to mind as well, but he and Webster both re-negotiated in the summer. I can see Rolle being asked
    to re-do his deal, as his number is absurdly high even for a player who is very
    productive and a good leader.




    In short, Jacobs and Bradshaw simply do not represent $10,000,000 production.
    It would not shock me if both are gone, and Jacobs is almost a sure thing at
    this point. His being released saved over $6,000,000 and with the
    tentativerenegotiating of another deal or two the Giants could have around
    $10,000,000 freed up. The real question is whether or not Rolle or Canty
    actually want to renegotiate.




    Its unlikely. Neither deserves to be cut, but both play a nod below their
    production at this point.




    With needs at tight end as well as various places across the roster, the
    Giants will have to be ready to redistribute some of this money so they can
    shell it out elsewhere such as the pockets of a guy like Victor Cruz or Kenny
    Phillips.




    Conclusion:


    “Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.” MB Rule # 1






    # 80

  2. #2

    Re: NEWS, NOTES, RUMORS, AND GOSSIP: SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2012 - 11:42 A.M.

    Thanks Rf I know this is a lot of work ! Thanks

  3. #3

    Re: NEWS, NOTES, RUMORS, AND GOSSIP: SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2012 - 11:42 A.M.

    thanks Roanoke! [B]

  4. #4
    Moderator RoanokeFan's Avatar
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    Re: NEWS, NOTES, RUMORS, AND GOSSIP: SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2012 - 11:42 A.M.

    [quote user="BigBlue1971"]thanks Roanoke! [B][/quote]

    [Y]
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.” MB Rule # 1






    # 80

  5. #5
    Moderator RoanokeFan's Avatar
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    Re: NEWS, NOTES, RUMORS, AND GOSSIP: SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2012 - 11:42 A.M.

    [quote user="Voldamort"]Thanks Rf I know this is a lot of work ! Thanks[/quote]

    [B]
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.” MB Rule # 1






    # 80

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